BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK (BSW)

ADMISSION AND PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The process for the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program occurs in four different phases: 1) initial application to the Social Work program, 2) program admission interview, 3) field application and interview, and 4) exit interview. 

Application and Admission Process

The application and program admission interview is required before any student enrolls in upper-division (300-400 level) Social Work (SWK) courses. The program interview is scheduled by the Department of Social Work upon successful completion and submission of the application. Applicants will be notified of a date and time of their interview with the Social Work Program Review Committee. The Social Work Program Review Committee determines the final decision for official acceptance, conditional acceptance, or denial to the program. 

Non-SWK majors who are interested in pursuing a BSW degree should seek out the Department of Social Work for advising before this process or during their final year of the Human Services Technician program. 

Admission Criteria

  • Successful completion of an Associate Degree in Social Work or Human Services preferred
  • Completed Social Work application, which includes the following: 
  • Student Handbook
  • Demographic Information Form
  • Two Reference Forms
  • Personal Statement/Essay
  • Background Check/Disclosure Form
  • Student Responsibility Statement of Commitment Form
  • NASW Code of Ethics Statement of Commitment Form
  • Unofficial Transcripts
  • Cumulative GPA of 2.00 (prior to entry)
  • “C” or above in SWK 255 and SWK 257
  • Program Interview
  • “Official” or “Conditional” acceptance to enroll in 300-400 level SWK Courses

The application does not guarantee entry to the Social Work program. More information on the application and admission process can be requested through the Department of Social Work.

Program Requirements

Upon admittance to the program, Social Work students are required to maintain a GPA of 2.50 and a “C” or above in all Social Work (SWK) courses. All Social Work students are required to adhere to program policies and guidelines and declare a statement of commitment to uphold the NASW Code of Ethics.

Field Requirements and Exit Interview

Students will undergo another application and interview process before entering their field education. This process ensures students have been assigned a field agency and are prepared for field learning in accordance with the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) 2015 Educational Policies and Accreditation Standards (EPAS).

Finally, Social Work students will undergo a final exit interview of the program after completion of Social Work courses with a “C” or above and completion of 450 field education hours.

Background Check

All students entering the Social Work program are required to undergo a background check. This background check is conducted through Sitting Bull College and includes a Federal, State, and Tribal background investigation. The Department of Social Work will be notified of the results of the background check. Note: a criminal history may limit or prevent students from getting field placements, preclude professional licensure, and/or affect employment possibilities. 

Sitting Bull College requires a fee of $100 to complete the background check. Students are responsible for this fee and for scheduling the background check with the Human Resources Department. The background check process can take several weeks; hence, students are required to submit applications promptly by the application deadline date.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

A bachelor’s degree in Social Work or BSW is the most common requirement for entry-level human service and social service positions. Many Social Work graduates are represented in public and private agencies, sectors, and organizations at the local, state, tribal, and international levels. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Social Work is a fast-growing and demanding profession with a median annual salary of $50,470 in May 2019 and projects an 11 percent job growth by 2028. (Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook. Retrieved on June 15, 2020, from https://www.bls.gov/ooh/community-and-social-service/social-workers.htm). 

Furthermore, Social Workers may specialize in a range of careers, but not limited to: Mental Health, Substance Abuse, School Social Work, Child Welfare, Families, Public Service and Politics, Healthcare and Medical Social Work, Perinatal Social Work, Forensic Social Work, Social Work and the Law, Administration, Education, Community Organization, Disaster Relief, Research and Policy Analyst, Gerontology, and Developmental Disabilities.

The Bachelor of Social Work program prepares students to become Generalist Social Work Practitioners, and life-long leaders and learners of the profession. The program cultivates Social Work leaders to implement and advocate for social, economic, and environmental justice, social programs, and social policy for vulnerable, marginalized, and at-risk individuals, children, families, groups, and communities across diverse populations. 

The Bachelor of Social Work program’s mission and goals reflect the values and beliefs of both the social work profession and the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ (Seven Council Fires). Coursework underscores the nexus between the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ values and the values of the Social Work profession in which students will actively reflect on throughout the program. Finally, the program cultivates students to become leaders of Social Work through the application and integration of knowledge that respects the profession and respects all human beings, their communities, and cultures. 

Student Learning Outcomes and Competencies

There is a need for the recruitment of Indigenous students into Social Work programs. More specifically, tribal college Social Work programs that prepare students to work with Indigenous children, families, and communities. This need is a result of the historical and critical health issues that affect the development and life span of Indigenous people across tribal communities. As a result, Indigenous Social Work graduates must be prepared with Social Work knowledge and skills to serve their tribal communities and help improve the disparities of current and future generations. 

The BSW program has undergone significant changes and improvements to create a more culturally based Indigenous Social Work program that supports tribal communities. Additionally, program curriculum, syllabi, and course content are in continuous development to meet the CSWE Education Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) and SBC’s mission and goals that are guided by Lakota/Dakota culture, values, and language.

The student learning outcomes have been adapted to reflect a bi-cultural perspective that supports both Ochethi Sakowin values and the CSWE competencies. Therefore, graduates will:

  1. Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior and Conduct with respect to the NASW Code of Ethics and Ochethi Sakowin values. 
  2. Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice with emphasis on Social Work with Indigenous People and tribal communities. 
  3. Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice with emphasis on Social Work with Indigenous People and tribal communities. 
  4. Engage in Practice informed Research and Research informed Practice with concern for Social Work with Indigenous People and tribal communities. 
  5. Engage in Policy Practice with emphasis on Social Work with Indigenous People and tribal communities. 
  6. Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities with emphasis on Social Work with Indigenous People and tribal communities. 
  7. Assess with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities with emphasis on Social Work with Indigenous People and tribal communities. 
  8. Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities with emphasis on Social Work with Indigenous People and tribal communities. 
  9. Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities with emphasis on Social Work with Indigenous People and tribal communities.

BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK

ENGL 110             Composition I…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

ENGL 120             Composition II……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 cr.

COMM 110           Fundamentals of Public Speaking……………………………………………………………………………………………… 3 cr.

MATH 102             Intermediate Algebra or higher…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 cr.

PSYC 100             First Year Learning Experience………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3 cr.

SOC 120               Transitions-Graduation & Beyond……………………………………………………………………………………………… 2 cr.

NAS 101 or           Ochethi Sakowin Language I…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

NAS 103                Introduction to Ochethi Sakowin Language, Culture & History

CSCI 101              Introduction to Computers…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 cr.

HUMANITIES or SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE…………………………………………………………………………………………… 6 cr.

                        One (1) three-hour course in the following area:

                                Criminal Justice—CJ 202, CJ 207, CJ208, CJ 225, or CJ 254

                                One (1) three-hour course in the following area:

                                Native American Studies—NAS 204 or NAS 208

HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2 cr.

                                Any two (2) one-hour courses or any one (1) two-hour course

LABORATORY SCIENCE – Choose any one (1) four-hour laboratory science course

                                BIOL 111 Concepts of Biology…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4 cr.

                                BIOL 150 General Biology I……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4 cr.

                                BIOL 220 Anatomy & Physiology I…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4 cr.

Total General Education Requirements…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 36 credits

CORE REQUIREMENTS

HS 203                  Interviewing……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4 cr.

HS 204                  Case Management…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4 cr.

HS 211                  Introduction to Addictions………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

HS 220                  Management and Administration in Human Services………………………………………………………………… 3 cr.

HS 260                  Crisis Intervention/Suicide Prevention……………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

HS 297                  Human Services Internship……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

PSYC 111             Introduction to Psychology………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3 cr.

PSYC 250             Developmental Psychology……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

SOC 220               The Family…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 cr.

SWK 255               Social Work in a Modern Society……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4 cr.

SWK 257               Human Behavior and the Social Environment I…………………………………………………………………………. 3 cr.

Total Core Requirements………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 36 cr.

SWK PROFESSIONAL CORE REQUIREMENTS

BAD 343                Grant Writing …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

ENGL 342             Research Writing in the Disciplines ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

MATH 210             Elementary Statistics…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 cr.

NAS Elective        Choose one (1) three credit NAS 300-400 level course:……………………………………………………………. 3 cr.

                                NAS 311, NAS 309, or NAS 421

SWK 256               Development of Social Welfare…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 cr.

SWK 300               Technical and Professional Documentation in Social Work ………………………………………………………. 2 cr.

SWK 310               Child Welfare I…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3 cr.

SWK 320               Child Welfare II: Native American Children & Families………………………………………………………………. 3 cr.

SWK 335               Social Work Methods I: Work with Individuals and Families ……………………………………………………… 3 cr.

SWK 356               Social Welfare Policy and Advocacy………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

SWK 357               Human Behavior and the Social Environment II ……………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

SWK 400               Social Work Field and Grad Prep ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1 cr.

SWK 401               Self-Care in Social Work Practice……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1 cr.

SWK 435               Social Work Methods II: Work with Groups……………………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

SWK 436               Social Work Methods III: Work with Communities and Organizations ………………………………………. 3 cr.

SWK 442               Research Methods in Social Work…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

SWK 445               Decolonizing Social Work with Indigenous Communities ………………………………………………………….. 3 cr.

SWK 490               Field Education……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12 cr.

SWK 491               Field Seminar…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1 cr.

Total Concentration Requirements………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 59 credits

TOTAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 131 CREDITS