Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions PDF

*Courses cross-referenced between divisions.

DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (AGEC)

141 INTRODUCTION TO AGRI-BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3

This is an introductory course dealing with the economic importance of the agribusiness community and the potential for employment with the agribusiness industry.

297 AGRICULTURE INTERNSHIP 1-3

This provides the student with the opportunity to experience the world of work in conjunction with their program of study.  One semester hour of credit is equivalent to forty-five (45) contact hours.  Prerequisite: Students through advisor approval will only be allowed to complete internship within the last two semesters of the Agriculture degree plan.  

299 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

ANIMAL AND RANGE SCIENCE (ARSC)

114 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL SCIENCE 3

General principles of the livestock industry and relationship to mankind.

140 INTRODUCTION TO BISON PRODUCTION 3

This course will be an introduction to bison production.  Topics will include: history, role in the plains culture, anatomy and physiology, breeding and genetics and bison behavior and herd dynamics.

160 INTRODUCTION TO HORSEMANSHIP 3

This course will offer students the knowledge on horsemanship training and will provide a successful career in the vast world of the horse industry business.

161 BASIC HORSEMANSHIP SKILLS 3

This course will provide basic horsemanship skills to the students and demonstrate the knowledge on nutritional sources that a horse needs. Prerequisite ARSC 160 Horsemanship or concurrent enrollment

162 HORSEMANSHIP NUTRITION & DISEASES 3

This course will provide the students the knowledge about the functions and properties of nutrients and effects of proper nutrition at the different stages of the life of a horse. Prerequisite: ARSC 160 Introduction to Horsemanship, ARSC161 Basic Horsemanship Skills or concurrent enrollment

163 HORSEMANSHIP CONFIRMATION & ANATOMY 3

This course will offer the student the ability to select a horse, whether buying for pleasure or business.

164 INTRODUCTION TO VET CARE AND MANAGEMENT 3

This course will offer the students the knowledge in use and effects of different kinds of medications and dispense with documentation.

165 HORSEMANSHIP BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3

This course will offer the student the opportunity to gain knowledge of the horse business industry.  

220 LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION 3

General production and management of major meat animal species.  Topics include: production systems, feeding, facilities, health, economics, and marketing.

236 INTRODUCTION TO RANGE MANAGEMENT 3

Principles of range management, which include plant identification, range evaluation, and range improvement.

240 BISON MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTION 3

Topics will include feeding and nutrition; health, diseases and parasites; bison handling and facilities; marketing, productions and economics; and the future of bison.

299 ANIMAL AND RANGE SCIENCE SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

PLANT SCIENCE (PLSC)

225 PRINCIPLES OF CROP PRODUCTION 3

This course will introduce the basic concepts and principles of crop production.  Topics covered will include an introduction to the crops of the Northern Great Plains and their uses, crop and weed identification, crop and weed physiology, nutrition, fertilizers, growth stages, soil conservation and land management, cropping systems, seeding and harvest, storage of crops, diseases, pests, and safe use of pesticides and herbicides.

299 PLANT SCIENCE SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

SOILS (SOIL)

210 INTRODUCTION TO SOIL SCIENCE 4

Physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils as related to use, conservation, and plant growth.

222 SOIL FERTILITY AND FERTILIZERS 2

Principles of plant nutrition and soil nutrient availability; soil testing and fertilizer recommendations and management. Macronutrient emphasis.   Prerequisite:  SOIL 210 Introduction to Soil Science

299 SOILS SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

431 SOIL CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT 3

This course covers the conservation of soil and water resources.  The management techniques necessary for conservation will be stressed.  Erosion topics which will be covered are soil erosion, wind erosion, predicting soil loss, land use planning, cropping systems and tillage practices.  Conservation structures, reclamation and irrigation management will be discussed.  Soil and water pollution will also be covered.  Prerequisite:  SOIL 210 Introduction to Soil Science  

DIVISION OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

ART (ART)

106 INTRODUCTION TO JEWELRY AND TOOL MAKING 3

An introduction to the history of jewelry making and a variety of tool making techniques.

107 POTTERY I 3

A study of forms, methods, materials, and the characteristics of pottery.  Basic hand-building techniques are explored in addition to contemporary concepts and ideas.  Techniques of firing and kiln building.  Native American history and culture will be emphasized.

110 INTRODUCTION TO ART 3

Lectures, films, slides of original works, discussions and demonstrations will be used to acquaint the student with the diverse dimensions of aesthetics, to discuss and analyze visual art forms as modes of expression; and to develop a basic understanding of the role of the visual arts in relation to one’s culture.

121 INTRODUCTION TO WATERCOLOR 1-3

A basic course in watercolor with emphasis on materials and various techniques.  This course will explore composition and color in an experimental approach to landscape, still life, figure and contemporary modes.

122 INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN 3

A course with emphasis on fundamental design and its application.  The visual elements of line, space, mass, value, color and texture will be studied with an emphasis in Native American Art.

130 BASIC DRAWING 3

Introduction to the technique of contour and gesture drawing.  Principles of composition and design in figure, still life, and landscape.  Media includes pencil, charcoal, pastels, pen and ink.

145 QUILLWORK 3

Students will begin this course gathering and sorting quills, collecting or selecting dye and drying quills.  Methods of applying quills to leather, etc.  Native American cultural and historic designs and color will be emphasized.

146 BEADWORK 3

DIVISION OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

ART (ART)

106 INTRODUCTION TO JEWELRY AND TOOL MAKING 3

An introduction to the history of jewelry making and a variety of tool making techniques.

107 POTTERY I 3

A study of forms, methods, materials, and the characteristics of pottery.  Basic hand-building techniques are explored in addition to contemporary concepts and ideas.  Techniques of firing and kiln building.  Native American history and culture will be emphasized.

110 INTRODUCTION TO ART 3

Lectures, films, slides of original works, discussions and demonstrations will be used to acquaint the student with the diverse dimensions of aesthetics, to discuss and analyze visual art forms as modes of expression; and to develop a basic understanding of the role of the visual arts in relation to one’s culture.

121 INTRODUCTION TO WATERCOLOR 1-3

A basic course in watercolor with emphasis on materials and various techniques.  This course will explore composition and color in an experimental approach to landscape, still life, figure and contemporary modes.

122 INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN 3

A course with emphasis on fundamental design and its application.  The visual elements of line, space, mass, value, color and texture will be studied with an emphasis in Native American Art.

130 BASIC DRAWING 3

Introduction to the technique of contour and gesture drawing.  Principles of composition and design in figure, still life, and landscape.  Media includes pencil, charcoal, pastels, pen and ink.

145 QUILLWORK 3

Students will begin this course gathering and sorting quills, collecting or selecting dye and drying quills.  Methods of applying quills to leather, etc.  Native American cultural and historic designs and color will be emphasized.

146 BEADWORK 3

This course will cover the basic stitches needed to complete beadwork used in Native American creations.

220 PAINTING I 3

This course is an introduction to painting in oil and acrylics.  It will provide experience in using different types of painting surface, materials and various techniques.  Students will gain exposure to some theories of color, design, and composition.

221 PAINTING II 3

Study of the techniques and concepts of painting, with an emphasis on design and creative expression.  Students are encouraged to explore their own cultural background and experience.  Prerequisite:  ART 220 Painting I

243 SILVERSMITHING I 3

A variety of techniques in silver will be explored including design layout, sawing, filing, soldering and finishing.

244 SILVERSMITHING II 3

Refinement of skills with emphasis on more complex designs, using a wider range of materials and techniques including casting.    Prerequisite:  ART 243 Silversmithing I

*245 NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN ART HISTORY 3

This is a survey course exploring the arts of North American peoples from Paleolithic to contemporary times.  Lectures, readings, audio-visual means, research and resource persons constitute the main learning activities.

*246 TRADITIONAL OCHETHI SAKOWIN ART 3

Lectures and demonstration of traditional arts forms.  Students will complete the production of one piece in a selected media.  

*247 NATIVE AMERICAN ART PROJECTS 3

Creation of art activity based on the five different cultural aesthetics:  Northwest Coast Transformation Masks, Plains Style Parfleches, Southeastern Shell Carving, Woodlands Beadwork, and Southwest Pottery Designs.  Students will be required to complete five (5) different projects.  

250 BEGINNING PHOTOGRAPHY 3

This course will introduce students to digital camera use and creative use of accessories.  It will help students understand differences in lenses, filters, and other attachments to produce creative photographs.  The course will help students to become more aware of light as it relates to photography and encourage students to incorporate Native American ideas into their pictures.  The course will also teach students how to photography in crime scene investigating.

299 ART SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

COMMUNICATIONS (COMM)

100 APPLIED COMMUNICATIONS 3

This course introduces students to public speaking and verbal communications in public settings and in work situations.  It emphasizes the formal preparation, practices, and presentations of speeches before a live audience of peers.  Topics for speeches will be career and/or work related.

110 FUNDAMENTALS OF PUBLIC SPEAKING 3

The theory and practice of public speaking with emphasis on content, organization, language, delivery and critical evaluation of messages.

299 COMMUNICATIONS SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

ENGLISH (ENGL)

099 COLLEGE WRITING PREPARATION 4

Reading and writing are complementary acts; strengthening the one also strengthens the other.  In this class students will learn strategies for reading with understanding and writing with insight and clarity.  These strategies include, among others, pre-reading techniques, editing, proofreading, and organizing ideas, paragraphs, and parts of sentences.  Applying these strategies to reading and writing activities will strengthen the ability to evaluate a variety of texts and communicate individual own ideas.  Laboratory required.

100 APPLIED ENGLISH 3

This course is designed to develop techniques and insight which will improve students’ writing ability and thinking processes; these techniques include:  knowing grammatical structure, using library resources, writing about the world of work, writing process papers and problem/solution papers based on work situations.

110 COMPOSITION I 3

Topics include rhetorical skills, critical thinking, research, and documentation needed for effective academic writing with an emphasis on coherence and idea development.  Understanding of basic grammar, sentence structure, and paragraph development is assumed.  

120 COMPOSITION II 3

This course expands on the techniques and skills needed for effective academic writing.  The emphasis of this course is building critical research writing skills with the aim of improving writing skills in all disciplines.  Prerequisite:  ENGL 110 Composition I

206 PRACTICAL RESEARCH:  PLANNING, DESIGNING, AND WRITING 2-3

Students studying the behavioral, social, and environmental science in addition to the various disciplines of the humanities will learn the practical process of research from initiating thesis inquiry to writing a completed project report using professional APA or MLA conventions.

211 CREATIVE WRITING 3

Exploration of creative writing techniques through poetry, short stories, and short dramatic pieces. Emphasis is placed on Native American forms of creative writing and resource materials.

220 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 3

Introduction to the different genres of literature, emphasizing literary terms and nomenclature involved in all literacy forms (short stories, novel, drama, and poetry.  Prerequisite ENGL 110 Composition I

221 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA 3

A survey of the world’s greatest dramatic literature from Greek times to the present, including Native American dramatic expression.  The history of playhouses and stagecraft, and other related arts of the theater are observed in connection with the study of world masterpieces.

238 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE 3

To provide a general survey of children’s literature from its origins to the present. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

241 WORLD LITERATURE 3

A study of the representative works of major writers throughout the world, especially looking at multi-cultural life views.

261 AMERICAN LITERATURE 3

A study of the representative works of major American writers from the Colonial Period through the present, including Native American writers.

299 ENGLISH SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

HISTORY (HIST)

101 WESTERN CIVILIZATION TO 1500 3

A survey of the major economics, intellectual, political, social, geographical and religious developments from beginning of civilization through the Persian, Greek, and Roman Empires ending with the Middle Ages.

102 WESTERN CIVILIZATION SINCE 1500 3

A survey of the major economic, intellectual, political, and social developments in Europe from the Renaissance to recent times.

103 AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865 3

An economic, intellectual, political and social survey of our nation including its colonial origins, the Revolution, the early growth of the nation, the issue of sectionalism, and the Civil War.

104 AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865 3

An economic, intellectual, political and social survey of our nation since the Civil War period including the areas of reconstruction, industrialization and our increasing involvement in global responsibilities.

*107 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY I 3

This course is an introduction to Native American history from before the European colonization through the 1760’s.

*108 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY II 3

This course is an introduction to Native American history from the era of the American Revolution through the 1920’s.

*109 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY III 3

This course is an introduction to Native American history from the era of the Indian Reorganization Act through to the present.

210 COLONIAL AMERICAN HISTORY 3

This course examines the Colonial period in American History up to the Revolutionary period. It will explore the intellectual, political, economic, religious, and social aspects of the British North American colonies.

211 WORLD CIVILIZATIONS TO 1500 4

An overview of the development of the world’s major civilizations from earliest times to 1500.  The major focus is on how developments in societies in the Americas, the West, China, India, southwest Asia, and Africa developed and influenced each other.

212 WORLD CIVILIZATIONS SINCE 1500 4

This is a continuation of HIS 211 and examines the development of societies in and around the world since the Reformation.  This course emphasizes the interactions of a globalized and interconnected world from this time to the present.

299 HISTORY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

300 GLOBAL ART HISTORY 3

This course is a survey of selected historical art and architecture including Asian, North American, African and Middle-Eastern. The course provides the student with a framework for looking at, understanding and appreciating the art and architecture of other cultures.

305 HISTORY OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR 3

This course will examine the origins, strategies, major events, and impact of World War II in both the Pacific and European theaters from the 1930s until 1945.

310 COLONIAL AMERICAN HISTORY 3

This course examines the Colonial period in American History up to the Revolutionary period. It will explore the intellectual, political, economic, religious, and social aspects of the British North American colonies.

499 HISTORY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

HUMANITIES (HUM)

101 INTRODUCTION TO HUMANITIES 3

This introductory survey course to the humanities explores selected world pieces in various forms to study human expression and experience as it relates languages, linguistics, literature, history, jurisprudence, philosophy, archeology, comparative religions, ethics, the history, criticism and theory of arts and aspects of the social sciences examining problems and insights in different cultures.

*202 NATIVE AMERICAN IMAGES IN FILM 3

This course will provide a critical examination of images and representations of Native Americans and their cultures in American film.  The course will include relevant readings and analysis of particular films by non-native and indigenous film makers.    

297 GENERAL STUDIES CAPSTONE 1

This interdisciplinary course serves as a summary and synthesis of courses in a student’s academic career. A capstone presentation and reflective paper culminate the course.

Prerequisite: Must be in final semester of AA General Studies degree.

299 HUMANITIES SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

497 GENERAL STUDIES CAPSTONE 1

This interdisciplinary course is a review of the major ideas and issues across the broad areas of communications, humanities, mathematics, sciences, and social/behavioral sciences. Through development of an integrated E-Portfolio, the student will demonstrate proficiency in Sitting Bull College’s four institutional outcomes.

MUSIC (MUSC)

100 MUSIC APPRECIATION 3

This class will attempt to increase the awareness and understanding of music through listening to and discussion of a wide variety of music. Students will review or learn basic elements of music critical to an appreciation of music through reading, lecture and hands-on activities.

*110 OCHETHI SAKOWIN MUSIC AND DANCE 3

This course will provide an introduction to the music and dance of the Ochethi Sakowin.  The course will include the traditional repertory, cultural context of musical and dance performance, musical styles and song types, dance styles, and study of dance regalia.  Some comparative material from other Native American tribes will be included.

299 MUSIC SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

101 INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN PHILOSOPHY 3

This course will provide the student with a broad overview of both traditional and contemporary philosophical trends.  Topics to be covered include: human nature, the human mind, and the concept of freedom.

201 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS 3

A study of the development and nature of ethical norms and judgments and the problem of determinism versus freedom and responsibility.

*208 OCHETHI SAKOWIN TRADITION, PHILOSOPHY, & SPIRITUALITY 3

This course is an examination of traditional Ochethi Sakowin philosophical and spiritual beliefs, specializing in the study of documentation of the history and evolution of Ochethi Sakowin ceremonies and rituals, as well as the “thought-in-practice” of traditional Ochethi Sakowin medicine people.

299 PHILOSOPHY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

DIVISION OF BUSINESS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/MANAGEMENT (BAD)

101 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 3

Introduction and analysis of the fundamental types of business organizations which include sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations.  Includes the study of the accountability flow chart. This course will enable the student to study the comparative advantages and disadvantages unique to each type of organization and society’s role in business. Emphasis on Native American heritage and culture.

103 LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS 3

Introduction and analysis of the legal environment of business.  Includes governmental regulations, contracts and property regulations.  Emphasis on Native American culture and heritage.  

201 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I .3

Introduction to the fundamentals of accounting including the classification of accounts, debits/credits, the basic financial statements, special journals, and adjusting and closing entries.

202 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II .3

Fundamentals of accounting that include control of cash, receivables/payables, plant and intangible assets, payroll, inventories, partnerships, corporations.  Prerequisite:  BAD 201 Accounting I.

203 PERSONAL AND SMALL BUSINESS FINANCE .3

This is a basic course to assist students in problems of buying, money management, and in understanding their place as consumers in society.  This course also includes practical application in banking services, investing, taxes, home ownership, credit cards, car ownership and business opportunities.  Emphasis on Native American culture and heritage.

208 ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING 3

The course will help students examine the marketing strategies and methods used by start-up, early-stage companies, and small business enterprises The objective of this course is to move away from the abstract and closer to the real environment Therefore we will be making extensive use of actual firm experiences via the case method and real-world observations. Students will also utilize hands-on experiences with writing and presenting.  Emphasis on Native American culture and heritage.  

211 PRINCIPLES OF SUPERVISION 3

This course offers practical information relating to personnel issues.  Course components include staffing, training, motivation, employee rights and responsibilities, and contractual agreements.  Emphasis on Native American culture and heritage.

212 CONFLICT RESOLUTION 3

Introduction to conflict resolution in business with consideration of positive and negative outcomes.  Causes of conflict will be considered with mediation procedures that might be utilized. Emphasis on Native American culture and heritage.

219 ENTREPRENEURIAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3

Content includes how to plan, organize, and manage an entrepreneurial business. Students will develop the skills to compose a business plan. Topics such as human resource development, ethics, finance, entrepreneurship and risk management, pricing, advertising, and promotion will be covered. Emphasis on Native American culture and heritage.

227 PROGRAM PLANNING 3

Basic grant administration including compliance, federal regulations, review of non-profit and profit, and minimal fund accountability.  Emphasis on Native American culture and heritage.

228 PROPOSAL WRITING 3

This course introduces the step-by-step fundamentals for private sources and public agencies proposal requirements, with the objective of having students write a grant to be submitted for funding.  Special emphasis will be placed on the needs of Native Americans since most funding is realized through grants and contracts.

229 GRANTS MANAGEMENT 3

Concepts and methods for providing financial and programmatic accountability of public and private grants will be covered.  Topics will include evaluation and reporting procedures.  Emphasis on Native American culture and heritage.

297 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP 1-3

This provides the student with the opportunity to experience the world of work in conjunction with their program of study.  One semester hour of credit is equivalent to forty-five (45) contact hours.  Prerequisite:  Students through advisor approval will only be allowed to complete internship within the last two semesters of the Business Administration degree plan.  

299 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/MANAGEMENT SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

301 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 3

This course covers the basic functions of a manager including planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling activities at all levels.  It is designed to provide students with the information essential to develop a framework about management and to develop managerial knowledge and skills.  

303 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 3

This course offers undergraduate students a practical introduction to the function and responsibilities of human resource management within any company—from staffing the organization, enhancing motivation and employee performance, to overseeing compensation and benefits.  

305 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 3

A research approach to management with emphasis on understanding, prediction, and control of human behavior in the organization setting.  Topics include individual behavior, interpersonal and group behavior, environmental adaptation, and organizational effectiveness.  

311 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3

A study of marketing techniques and practices.  The topics include:  Strategic marketing and its environment, using technology for customer relationships in a global environment, target market selection and research, customer behavior, product decisions, pricing decisions, distribution decisions, and promotion decisions.  

323 PAYROLL ACCOUNTING 3

A study of the various state and federal laws pertaining to payment of wages and salaries, preparation of employment records, payroll registers, employee earning records, time cards and state and federal reporting requirements.  Prerequisite: BAD 201 Accounting I

333 BUSINESS WRITING 3

A course of modern practices in preparing, planning, writing and dictating types of business letters, memos, and reports which is commonly required in business operations.  Prerequisites:  ENGL 120 Composition II, CSCI 101 Introduction to Computers

353 TAX PROCEDURES 3

The course includes explanation and interpretation of the Internal Revenue Code in preparation and filing of federal income tax returns for individuals, partnerships, and corporations.  Instruction includes VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) volunteer training and a computer lab component.  Business topics include inventory, cost of goods sold, depreciation and business use of a home.  Prerequisite:  BAD 201 Accounting I

363 BUSINESS FINANCE 3

A course study in management of Capital in Business including asset structure, risk, income, cash flows, working capital and long term financing with some emphasis on International finance.  Prerequisites:  ECON 201 Microeconomics, ECON 202 Macroeconomics, MATH 103 College Algebra.

401 NEW VENTURE 3

The process of getting a new venture started, growing the venture, successfully harvesting it and starting again.  The concepts of entrepreneurship and competencies, skills, know-how and experience those that are sufficient to pursue different entrepreneurial opportunities.  Prerequisite: BAD 219 Entrepreneurial Business Management

405 BUSINESS LAW 3

The course offers a basic explanation of the legal rights and responsibilities of people in both the public and private sectors.  

406 BUSINESS ETHICS 3

A course covering the complex environment in which managers confront ethical decisions.  Understanding how to recognize the different kinds of business ethical dilemmas and knowing why they occur.  The course explores the cost to business and society of unethical and illegal behavior.  

434 WORLD BUSINESS 3

A comprehensive coverage of a broad range of topics and the steps a business must take to go global.  The course focuses on huge multi-national corporations as well as the small and medium-sized enterprises. It also compares and contrasts articles that present conflicting opinions on international issues such as globalization, trade, country differences, and global strategy.  Prerequisite: ECON 201 Microeconomics or ECON 202 Macroeconomics

453 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT 3

This course provides a basis for integrating knowledge of various business disciplines.  Skills developed are applied to the formation and implementation of strategic operation plans.  The case study method is used throughout the course.  Prerequisite: BAD 219 Entrepreneurial Business Management or BAD 301 Principles of Management

497 INTERNSHIP/SEMINAR 3

This course is intended for the student nearing completion of a degree goal.  This course involves a more intense participation and responsibility in the area of study of Business Administration.  Prerequisite:  Senior Standing or Department Chair Approval.

499 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/MANAGEMENT SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

BUSINESS & OFFICE TECHNOLOGY (BOTE)

247 SPREADSHEET APPLICATIONS 3

To provide hands-on experience using a spreadsheet application software package to gather, organize, and summarize numeric business data.  Prerequisite: CSCI 101 Introduction to Computers

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CIS)

128 MICROCOMPUTER HARDWARE I 3

Students learn the functionality of hardware and software components as well as suggested best practices in maintenance and safety issues.  The students, through hands-on activities and labs, will learn to assemble and configure a computer, install operating systems and software, and troubleshoot hardware and software problems. In addition, this course helps students prepare for CompTIA’s A+ certification.

129 MICROCOMPUTER HARDWARE II 3

Students learn the functionality of hardware and software components as well as suggested best practices in maintenance and safety issues.  The students, through hands-on activities and labs, will learn to assemble and configure a computer, install operating systems and software, and troubleshoot hardware and software problems. In addition, this course helps students prepare for CompTIA’s A+ certification.

164 NETWORKING FUNDAMENTALS I 4

This course focuses on the following: network terminology and protocols, Local Area Networks (LANs), Wide Area Networks (WANs), Open System Interconnection, (OSI) models, cabling, cabling tools, routers, router programming, Ethernet, Internet Protocol (IP) addressing, network standards. The first of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certifications.

165 NETWORKING FUNDAMENTALS II 4

This course focuses on the following: initial router configuration, Cisco IOS software management, routing protocol configuration, TCP/IP, and Access control lists (ACLs). Students will develop skills in configuring a router, managing Cisco IOS Software, configuring routing protocols, and creating access lists that control access to a router. The second of four courses leading to the Cisco Certified Network Associate CCNA) certification. Prerequisite: CIS 164 Networking Fundamentals I.

181 CREATING WEB PAGES 3

Students create web sites using a current version of a graphical user interface (GUI) web authoring tool.

212 OPERATING SYSTEMS CLIENT 3

The course helps learners to gain the knowledge and skills to install, configure, customize, optimize, and troubleshoot the Microsoft Windows operating system in a stand-alone and network environment

215 IMPLEMENTING A SERVER ENVIRONMENT 3

This course introduces the learner to the Microsoft Windows Server and the networking technologies it supports. The learner will become familiar with networking and operating system concepts and the common tasks required to administer and support the Microsoft Windows operating system in a network environment.

297 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INTERNSHIP 3

This provides the student with the opportunity to experience the world of work in conjunction with their program of study.  One semester hour of credit is equivalent to forty-five (45) contact hours. Prerequisite: Students through advisor approval will only be allowed to complete internship within the last two semesters of the degree plan.

299 COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSCI)

101 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS 3

General hardware and software such as: terminology, environments. Applications such as: word processing, spreadsheets, databases, Internet usage.

119 SURVEY OF COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3

This course provides the student with an overview of computer information systems, fundamental computer concepts and programming techniques.  Hands-on experience with selected business software and one programming language is utilized.

122 VISUAL BASIC 3

Introduction to programming in the BASIC/Visual BASIC language.

133 DATABASE CONCEPTS I (SQL) 3

This course provides the student with an introduction to the structure and function of database systems, with emphasis on practical applications. Data structures, hierarchical relationships, sequential and indexed searching, updating and deleting records, and data security and recovery will be discussed. The students will use the select statement to query the database and produce the correct outcomes. Students will use functions, join multiple tables and create sub-queries.

160 COMPUTER SCIENCE I 4

An introduction to computer science including problem-solving, algorithm development and structured programming in a high-level language. Emphasis on design, coding, testing and documentation of programs using accepted standards of style.

299 COMPUTER SCIENCE SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

DIVISION OF CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

ARCHITECTURE (ARCT)

101 ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 4

This course is an introduction to architectural drafting and AutoCAD, which defines the skills necessary to interpret a blueprint during construction.  Students will learn the step-by-step process for designing and laying out a set of working drawings for a residential home.

144 CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATING 2

This course is an introduction to residential material and labor estimating, material lists, and calculations.  Costs are made for several different houses.

CARPENTRY (CARP)

102 CORE CURRICULUM 2

The course will establish safety procedures, shop and site operations, the proper use and maintenance of tools from the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) consisting of eight modules.

105 CONSTRUCTION MATH 3

Application of math operations and calculations that a carpenter will need to perform when constructing a building and preparing an estimate.  

120 PRINCIPLES OF FRAMING 3

Identification of floor, wall and roof framing members to include layout and assembly of house framing members.  Estimate material for framing.  

125 CONSTRUCTION PRACTICUM I 4

This lab course will include the safe and proper use of tools in various construction projects.  The semester activities will center around the actual construction of a house.  

140 PRINCIPLES OF INTERIOR FINISH 2

This course will include the identification of interior framing techniques and procedures to include insulation, drywall and drywall finishing, and door and window trim.  

145 CONSTRUCTION PRACTICUM II 4

This lab course is a practical building application, which includes insulation, drywall hanging, taping and texture, painting, and installing interior doors and trim.  Activities will center around the actual construction of a house.

160 CONCRETE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 1

This course discusses the use of concrete, reinforcing for footings and foundations, and making concrete estimations.

222 CONSTRUCTION SAFETY 2

Construction Safety is a minimum of 10 hours of safety topics related to the construction industry.  Upon completion of this course students will receive a 10 Hour OSHA Safety Card and a certificate from the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER).

240 ADVANCED INTERIOR FINISHING 3

This lab course will teach the student to identify and install all interior finish products such as window trim, extension jams, baseboards, handrails, and hardware.

245 CONSTRUCTION PRACTICUM III 4

This lab course will cover building applications which includes the safe and proper use of power tools, roofing and siding, and additional experience in house framing.  Activities will center around the actual construction of a house.

255 CONSTRUCTION PRACTICUM IV 4

This lab course will provide the student with practical experience to perform interior finish procedures to industry standards.  Activities will center around the actual construction of a house.

299 BUILDING TRADES SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

COMMERCIAL DRIVERS LICENSE (CDL)

100 CDL PERMIT 4

This course is designed to assist students with the skills necessary to pass the North Dakota or South Dakota State Commercial Driver’s License permit test.

105 NOVICE CDL TRAINING 2

This course is designed to gain a working knowledge of a tractor and trailer.  Included in this course is basic driving skill training in a controlled environment with highway training to follow.  Students must obtain their CDL Permit in order to participate in the driving portion of the class.

106 CDL REFRESHER COURSE 1

This course is designed to give students a review of the skills necessary to pass the North Dakota/South Dakota State Commercial Driver’s License permit test.

107 ADVANCED CDL DRIVING 3

This course prepares students for advanced driving skills needed to obtain their commercial driver’s license. Students must possess a current CDL permit in order to attend this class.

109 DRIVER ENDORSEMENTS 3

This course covers an overview of the hazardous materials endorsement as well as additional driver endorsements.

ELECTRICAL (ECAL)

101 ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS I 3

This course will introduce the student to the various electrical properties and the equipment which produces those properties.  Basic circuitry will be examined, utilizing algebraic skills to perform the calculations.

102 ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS II 3

This course will introduce the student to alternating current.  The electrical properties and their effects on the circuit will be examined.  Basic trigonometric skills will be utilized to perform calculations for analyzing various electrical circuits.  

103 ELECTRICAL CODE STUDY 3

A preliminary study of the National Electrical Code.  Wiring design and protection, wiring methods and materials, and equipment for general use are covered.

104 ELECTRICAL TRADES MATH 2

This course will cover basic technical math skills required for students preparing for apprenticeship.

106 ELECTRICAL PRACTICUM I 4

This course will provide the student with practical experience in the Electrical field and finishing projects according to industry standards.  This course will allow them to put into practice the electrical fundamentals and electrical code learned in previous or concurrent classes.  Lab required.

132 COMMERICIAL & AGRICULTURAL WIRING 3

Consists of lectures giving an introduction to basic electricity, basic wiring circuits, electric motors, materials and tools used, and wiring methods.  Students also perform practicum work with actual circuit layout and installation of various raceways, as well as connecting of special equipment used in commercial and industrial applications, in accordance with the rules and regulations of the National Electrical Code.  

133 RESIDENTIAL WIRING 2

Consists of lectures giving an introduction to basic wiring circuits, materials and tools used and wiring methods in accordance with the rules and regulations of the National Electrical Code.  

206 ELECTRICAL PRACTICUM II 4

This course will provide the student with practical experience in the Electrical field and finishing projects according to industry standards.  This course will allow them to put into practice the electrical fundamentals and electrical code learned in previous or concurrent classes.  

HAZWOPER (HAZ)

099 HAZWOPER TRAINING—24 HOUR 1

Training is for workers at sites containing known hazardous materials who may witness or discover a release that requires notification of the proper authorities. Curriculum meets initial off-site training requirements in accordance with 20 CFR 1910.120 for workers in proximity to hazardous substances, hazardous wastes, hazardous materials, or health hazards, including emergency response. Students will receive hands-on training in regulations, site characterization, hazard identification, safe work practices, site control, personal protective equipment, monitoring, medical surveillance, decontamination, and emergency response.      

100 HAZWOPER TRAINING 3

This course covers proper handling of hazardous waste materials needed for oil rig workers.

HOME ENERGY AUDIT (HEA)

111 ENERGY AUDIT PROCESS 3

This course will introduce the student to the proper methods of conducting a home energy audit.  The student will gain an understanding of consumer utility bills, charges and rates.

112 RESIDENTIAL ENERGY 2

This course will cover an overview of the study of electrical source, electrical delivery, AC and DC power usage.  This course will also cover relaying this knowledge to future customers in order to help them understand their utility usage and charges.

113 AIR LEAKAGE AND INSULATION 3

This course will teach students how to safely operate diagnostic equipment, blower doors, dust blasters and all associated auditing equipment.

114 HEALTH AND SAFETY 2

This course will train students how to recognize hidden health risks, poisonous gases, mold and parasites. Students will also learn the proper use of any associated hand tools.

115 ALTERNATIVE ENERGY 2

This course will study renewable energy sources and their benefits.

HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR (HEO)

101 HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATION TRAINING I 8

Heavy Equipment Operation Certificate I has a comprehensive classroom instruction (40 hours), as well as field time on the equipment (80 hours). The instruction is for three weeks and taught in 7 modules. These models include: 1). Orientation to the Trade; 2).Heavy Equipment Safety; 3). Identification of Heavy Equipment; 4). Basic Operation Techniques; 5). Utility Tractor Operation; 6). Introduction to Earthmoving; and 7). Grades (preparing graded surfaces using heavy equipment). In order to gauge the learned skills for each student, written tests will be utilized as well as field tasks for each module and/or machine. This will allow for documented standardized performance feedback as well as provide the candidates with National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certification.

201 HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATION TRAINING II 8

Heavy Equipment Operation Certificate II has a comprehensive classroom instruction (40 hours), as well as field time on the equipment (80 hours). The instruction is for three weeks and taught in 14 modules. These models include: 1). Introduction to Earthmoving; 2). Dump Trucks; 3). Rollers. 4). Scrapers; 5). Loaders; 6). Grades part 2; 7). Civil Blueprint Reading; 8). Bulldozers; 9). Backhoes; 10). Excavators; 11). Motor Graders; 12). Advanced Operational Techniques; 13). Finishing and Grading; and 14). Soils.  In order to gage the learned skills for each student, written tests will be utilized as well as field tasks for each module and/or machine. This will allow for documented standardized performance feedback as well as provide the candidates with National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) certification. Prerequisite: HEO 101 Heavy Equipment Operation Training I

OIL (OIL)

101 OIL DRILLING OPERATIONS 5

This course will provide students with the knowledge of the overall operations of what is involved in drilling a well.  This instruction will include: drilling theory, rig equipment, rig components, roles and responsibilities, oral demonstrations and exams to assess their learning abilities.  Students will learn how to work safely and effectively among co-workers with a clear understanding of what is happening around them.

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY & HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (OSHA)

100 SAFETY COURSE 1

This course will offer training to ensure each student knows, understands and follows the applicable provisions of construction safety.

101 H2S SAFETY TRAINING 3

This course will prepare students to actively monitor and identify sources of hydrogen sulfide gas. Students will be trained on creating and implementing a contingency plan that covers response to an emergency and preventative measures.

201 CONSTRUCTION COURSE—30 HOUR 2

This course is a comprehensive safety program designed for anyone involved in construction industry. Specifically devised for safety directors, foreman, and field supervisors, the program provides complete information on OSHA compliance issues.

PETROLEUM ENERGY CENTER CORE COMPLIANCE (PEC)

100 PEC CORE COMPLIANCE SAFETY TRAINING 2

This course covers proper protective equipment and procedures relating to safety on an oil rig. Emphasizing the importance of the student being responsible for his/her actions and behavior.

WATER TREATMENT (WATR)

101 INTRODUCTION TO WATER TREATMENT 3

This course is designed to give students a basic, comprehensive introduction to water treatment processes, equipment use and operator responsibilities.

102 SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 3

This course covers the personal protective equipment and proper safe work practices and proper safe work practices and procedures commonly used in the energy industry. Students will also gain a working knowledge of potential hazards and environmental protection awareness.

103 MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT 3

This course introduces mechanical concepts commonly found in a plant setting.  Students will come become familiar with common hand tools and terminology found in many plants.

104 PIPING SYSTEMS AND INSTRUMENTS 3

This course provides students with an overview of the piping systems involving dimensions, connections, blinding and more.  Students will learn more about control system, instrument diagrams, level pressure and flow devices.  

WELDING (WELD)

100 ORIENTATION & SAFETY (OSHA 10) 1

This course is designed to give the student a broad overview of the various welding and machining processes as well as their applications and to develop safe working habits and become aware of safe working conditions in the Welding and Machine Trades (OSHA).

101 OA WELDING & CUTTING 2

This course provides the theory to develop the manual skills necessary to produce high quality welding using the oxyacetylene welding and cutting processes on mild steel.  This course will also provide the lab to develop these skills. Laboratory required.

103 GMA WELDING 2

This course provides the theory to develop the manual skills necessary to produce high quality welds on mild steel plate using the gas metal process in all positions.

104 SMA WELDING 2

This course provides the technical lab training and classroom training to develop the manual skills necessary to produce high quality welds on mild steel plate in all positions using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process according to the American Welding Society (AMW) standards.

107 INTRODUCTION TO PIPE WELDING 2

This course provides the theory to develop the manual skills necessary to produce high quality welds on mild steel plate using the gas metal process in all positions.

153 WELDING PRACTICUM 4

This course will cover a basic understanding of pipe welding using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. The positions of welds will be 1G, 2G, 5G and 6G utilizing various electrodes.

DIVISION OF EDUCATION

COMMUNCATION DISORDER (CD)

426 SPEECH/LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT & DISORDER FOR THE TEACHER 3

The study of speech-language development and disorders of children.  Inter-relationships among personal, social, academic, speech and language skills are covered.  Academic modifications and coordination with specialized personnel are emphasized.  Prerequisite:  SPD 200 Exceptional Children and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (ECE)

210 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 2

This course will explore the historical and philosophical foundation of the care and schooling of young children, ages 0 – 8.  Attention will be given to current practices and concerns regarding young children.  Career options in Early Childhood will be explored.  Personal characteristics and legal requirements suitable for the profession will be reviewed. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

211 INTRODUCTION TO ASSESSMENT 1

This course is designed to help students become oriented to the various types of assessment used to evaluate their success in the Early Childhood program of studies. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration.

213 LANGUAGE & LITERACY DEVELOPMENT IN ECE 3

This course will introduce students to the many aspects of language; such as how it is acquired, its function, how it develops, and various strategies to help support development and communication.  Students will develop a language learning activity for presentation, which includes speaking, writing, and listening. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

228 DEVELOPING LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS 2

This course will help students design classroom/daycare environments that enhance curriculum. Issues to be examined include child nutrition, growth, disease, accident prevention and indoor and outdoor safety.  Environmental adaptations for children with special needs are included in this class. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

233 PRE-K METHODS AND MATERIALS 3

This course is designed to emphasize the importance of appropriate curriculum planning, materials, and strategies to use with young children and their families.  The student will learn to apply creativity to the educational setting and design developmentally appropriate strategies utilizing play, art, music, movement, drama, and other creative concepts. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

236 SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT & GUIDANCE IN ECE 2

This course will focus on developmentally appropriate, effective guidance and classroom management techniques for young children.  Strategies for guiding behavior and the relationship between development, children’s behavior, culture, and the environment are presented. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

238 CHILD, FAMILY & COMMUNITY RELATIONS 3

This course is designed to integrate the diverse environments and relationships in which children develop the interactions that take place within and between environments.  This course will stress the need for strategies of effective communication, the identification of family systems and dynamics, and the relationship in which parents and professionals work together as an instructional team.  This course will include a comprehensive look at parent-school participation. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

252 STAGES OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT 3

This class examines the emotional, social, physical, cognitive, and language development of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers of diverse backgrounds.  This course provides a hands-on guide for teacher/caregivers in determining the characteristics of typical and atypical development. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

254 EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM AND METHODS 2

This course is designed to assist students in developing meaningful curriculum and effective instructional methods for children ages 0 – 8.  The emphasis will be on selecting developmentally appropriate topics of study, planning and implementing integrated curriculum and activities that are reflective of the children’s interests and which will foster development in all learning domains. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

297 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION INTERNSHIP 3

This provides the student with the opportunity to experience the world of work in conjunction with their program of study.  One semester hour of credit is equivalent to forty-five (45) contact hours.  Students will be required to obtain a background check before any observations. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Students will only be allowed to complete internship within the last two semesters of the Early Childhood Education Associate’s degree plan.   

299 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

304 FOUNDATIONS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 3

This course is a comprehensive overview of the sociological, historical, psychological, and philosophical foundations underlying the development and purposes of Early Childhood education.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

310 DEVELOPMENT & DISORDERS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION 3

This course covers all of the aspects of special education for the young child from a theoretical-developmental perspective.  Attention is paid to the issues of special education’s historical foundations, the growth and development of the discipline, working with families, assessment and intervention.  The future educator will gain a solid concept of exceptionality when compared to normal growth and development.  The students will have a solid “knowledge-content-applications” approach from which to teach children from 0-8 years old with special needs.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

315 EARLY CHILDHOOD MATH AND SCIENCE METHODS 3

This class is designed to teach strategies that engage children in learning mathematical concepts and the use of science processing. This class also includes a practicum.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

320 EARLY CHILDHOOD SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS 3

This class includes the study of teaching and skill development including methodology, curriculum and global issues, computer assisted instruction and management, assessment, and evaluation for children ages 0-8.  This class also includes a practicum. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

322 ADMINISTRATION & LEADERSHIP IN ECE 3

This class explores aspects of administering early childhood programs.  Program development focusing on local and state regulations, financing, personnel management, environmental design, and staff development will be examined.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

325 READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS METHODS 4

This class includes an investigation and analysis of the role of language arts of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, along a developmental continuum for children ages 0 – 8.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

330 OBSERVATION/ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 3

Students will become acquainted with various techniques of child observation.  The students will record and disseminate observations to aid in curriculum planning, behavior management, and parent collaboration.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

337 INCLUSION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTINGS 3

By helping the early childhood educators understand the basic needs of disabled children they will be better able to meet all children’s needs.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

338 PLAY AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT IN ECE 2

Play is one of the main vehicles by which children assimilate their experiences with the world around them.  During this class, students will discover how to successfully use play to enhance learning.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

362 EARLY CHILDHOOD HUMANITIES 2

The study of aesthetic and physical development of young children ages 0 – 8 will be included in this class.  The course will provide an opportunity for students to develop knowledge and skills in ways of creating a positive environment for the creative, physical, psychological and social growth of young children. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

428 ISSUES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 3

This course is designed to be the culminating course in the Early Childhood program with emphasis on research and technology.  Students will research and write about a topic of their choice in Early Childhood. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite:  Must be within one semester of ECE 497 Internship – Field Study and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

495 FOUNDATIONS OF ACTION RESEARCH IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

EDUCATION 3

Action research is a component of reflective practice and professional learning defined as a systematic, reflective, collaborative process that examines a situation for the purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating change.  Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

496 ACTION RESEARCH IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 12

This course takes the student through the entire process of a formal Action Research Project. A final presentation to SBC employees will be required of each student completing their research project. Prerequisite: EED 495 Foundations of Action Research in Early Childhood Education and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

497 EARLY CHILDHOOD INTERNSHIP – FIELD STUDY 12

This internship prepares Early Childhood candidates with the opportunity to work alongside a professional in Early Childhood.  During the field study period, the candidate will observe, develop lessons while under the tutelage of a professional and eventually be in charge of the setting with either a daycare group or a group in preschool.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Candidates must have completed their coursework prior to enrolling in the internship.  Prerequisites:  Senior status or consent of the instructor and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

499 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

EDUCATION (EED)

250 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION 2

This course is designed for students who are planning to major in education, with an emphasis on Ochethi Sakowin thought, philosophy, and culture.  The course consists of two components: a) orientation to the teacher education program; b) observing experienced teachers as well as students. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

 

254 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT 3

This course is designed to familiarize students with basic theories of classroom control and to give them a working knowledge of classroom management.  It will focus on prevention and remediation of problems through focusing on lesson content and evaluation of learning.  Students will become familiar with current teaching methods and models for elementary teachers. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

256 FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 3

This course introduces the prospective teacher to the historical, social, and philosophical foundations of the American education system as well as the Ochethi Sakowin education system.  In addition to the class time spent on campus, students are required to spend 30 hours of observations/participation in area classrooms. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

260 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3

This course introduces students to the fundamental psychological principles underlying education and examines how these principles can be applied in the class setting to facilitate learning.  It includes discussion of relevant theories and topics including student needs, learning styles, cognitive processing, reflective teaching, and characteristics of learning environments and student assessment. This course introduces humanistic, cognitive, behavioral and psychological models of classroom management. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: PSYC 111 Introduction to Psychology

262 STRATEGIES, METHODS & OBSERVATION IN TEACHER EDUCATION 4

Students will become acquainted with various techniques of child observation. The students will record and disseminate observations to aid in curriculum planning, behavior management, and parent collaboration. Students will also learn to accurately interpret observation results and plan strategies to take appropriate action. The student will also be provided with a survey of current teaching methods and models for the elementary setting. A practicum is included in this class. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

277 MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHER I 3

Utilizing a problem-solving approach, this course will provide a background in the structure and theory of mathematics including whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers. Local, state, and national standards are addressed as well as the use of appropriate technology.  Students will explore current elementary math programs and teaching techniques.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: MATH 103 College Algebra

278 MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHER II 2

This course is the second semester in a sequence of the study of mathematics theory for elementary teachers. This course will provide a background in the structure and theory of mathematics and will include the following topics: rational and real numbers, statistics, probability, measurement, and geometry. The class will explore current elementary math programs and teaching techniques. Mathematics standards are addressed also.   Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite:  EED 277 Math for Elementary Teacher I

290 ART FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHER 2

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts needed to teach art in the elementary classroom.  Students will experience a broad range of activities, materials and teaching strategies in a workshop type setting.  The main intent will be for students to develop an appreciation for self-expression and divergent thinking through art.  An integrated approach to teaching art using listening, speaking, reading and writing will be explored.  Students will become acquainted with audio-visual materials. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

297 TEACHER EDUCATION INTERNSHIP 3

This provides the student with the opportunity to experience the world of work in conjunction with their program of study.  One semester hour of credit is equivalent to forty-five (45) contact hours. Students will be required to obtain a background check before any observations. Students will complete this internship within the last two semesters of the Teacher Education degree plan.  

298 PRE-PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 1

This course consists of documented observations in a variety of K-12 classrooms.  The students will also experience the rewards and challenges in an educational setting.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. This course is taken in conjunction with EED 250 Introduction to Education.

299 EDUCATION SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

301 INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY INTO THE CLASSROOM 2

This course is designed to provide opportunities for the development of skills and strategies needed to integrate both instructional and assistive technologies into the curriculum throughout all disciplines and all grades. This course provides a thorough understanding of how to use PowerPoint, online activity and reporting databases, interactive whiteboards, audio/video devices, and other instructional tools for personal and classroom use. The course also gives strategies and tools for using assistive, adaptive and rehabilitative devices for people with disabilities and also includes the process used in selecting, locating, and using them. The candidate will develop methods to teach students to use instructional and assistive technologies for the benefit of all learners. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: CSCI 101 Introduction to Computers and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

305 METHODS OF TEACHING IN THE ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE, AND SECONDARY SCHOOL 3

This course is designed to provide a survey of current teaching methods and models for elementary, middle, and secondary teaching.  Develop competencies in using a variety of instructional strategies and materials through videotaped microteaching experiences.  Students will write appropriate lesson plans and develop culturally relevant units. Students will be exposed standards approved by the state of North Dakota. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisites:  EED 250 Introduction to Education, EED 260 Educational Psychology, EED 298 Pre-Professional Experience and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

310 METHODS OF TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2 Students will have the opportunity to preview science materials and learn how to use them in a classroom through planning and simulation. This course provides opportunities for students to develop an understanding of what science is and how children learn.  State content standards will be introduced and students will learn to integrate science lessons with other content areas including Ochethi Sakowin studies, with an emphasis on the integration with math and to critique science materials, activities, and children’s materials for appropriateness.  Students will identify the fields of study and explore cultural variations in science learning and teaching. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisites:  EED 250 Introduction to Education, EED 260 Educational Psychology, EED 298 Pre-Professional Experience.  Co-requisite:   EED 305 Methods of Teaching in the Elementary, Middle, and Secondary School and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

315 METHODS OF TEACHING MATH IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2

This course is designed to provide a survey of current teaching methods in mathematics and to develop competencies in using various instructional strategies and materials including those involving calculators and computers.  Problem solving approaches to teaching mathematics and providing teaching experiences using manipulatives will be included.  Current state math standards will be emphasized as well as the integration of mathematics within the curriculum, in particular the connections between math, science and technology. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisites:  EED 250 Introduction to Education, EED 260 Educational Psychology, EED 298 Pre-Professional Experience. Co-requisite: EED 305 Methods of Teaching in the Elementary, Middle, and Secondary School and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

320 METHODS OF TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY                             SCHOOL 2

This course is intended to provide students an opportunity to explore multiple social studies teaching methods.  Students will have an opportunity to read and discuss literature concerning the teaching of the social sciences and will create teaching units, which exemplify these methods. State standards will be introduced and used in writing lesson plans and unit plans. Students will be expected to utilize all resources available to them including print and electronics. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisites:  EED 250 Introduction to Education, EED 260 Educational Psychology, EED 298 Pre-Professional Experience. Co-requisite: EED 305 Methods of Teaching in the Elementary, Middle, and Secondary School and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

325 METHODS OF TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2

This course is designed to provide a survey of current teaching methods in the language arts and to develop competencies in using various instructional strategies and materials.  All major aspects of expressive and receptive language will be addressed.  State standards will be introduced and students will be required to develop lesson plans, projects, and teaching units that integrate the language arts throughout the curriculum.  Current theories in teaching language arts will be explored.  Students will be required to work with children in a classroom that reflects the Service Learning model of instruction. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisites:  EED 250 Introduction to Education, EED 260 Educational Psychology, EED 298 Pre-Professional Experience. Co-requisite: EED 305 Methods of Teaching in the Elementary, Middle, and Secondary School and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

330 METHODS OF TEACHING READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3

This course is designed to provide a survey of current teaching methods in expository and narrative reading materials; develop competence in using various instructional strategies; promote an enthusiasm for reading in elementary and middle school classrooms; and teach skills that will ensure future teachers can establish a balanced literacy approach in their classrooms.  State standards will be introduced and used in writing lesson plans and unit plans. Different approaches toward analysis and reading comprehension will be discussed and modeled.  Research related to reading styles will be discussed and integrated throughout the course.  Current theories that build upon the unique strengths that each student possesses will be discussed. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisites:  EED 250 Introduction to Education, EED 260 Educational Psychology, EED 298 Pre-Professional Experience. Co-requisite: EED 305 Methods of Teaching in the Elementary, Middle, and Secondary School and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

335 METHODS OF TEACHING MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2

The purpose of this class is to provide the elementary education major with the necessary knowledge and skills required to teach music to their students. State standards will be introduced. This class will provide opportunities to explore the possibilities of the integration of music across the curriculum, presenting a more enACCUPLACERing and less fragmented over-all education for the students. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisites:  EED 250 Introduction to Education, EED 260 Educational Psychology, EED 298 Pre-Professional Experience. Co-requisite: EED 305 Methods of Teaching in the Elementary, Middle, and Secondary School and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

345 METHODS AND MATERIALS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2

This course is designed to provide pre-service teachers with an understanding of instructional methods, techniques, learning styles, and skill necessary to teach elementary level students. State content standards will be introduced and emphasis will be placed on the importance of health, physical movement, and activity as an integral part of the elementary curriculum. Students will participate in class activities and discussions relative to the specialized field of health and physical education. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisites:  EED 305 Methods of Teaching in the Elementary, Middle, and Secondary School and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

350 CURRICULUM PLANNING, DELIVERY, AND ASSESSMENT FOR THE ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE, AND SECONDARY SCHOOL SETTING 2

This course is designed to provide the pre-service teacher with knowledge about the various types of curriculum. Students will use state standards to help guide the curriculum process participants will experience the selection of curriculum, the development of curriculum, and the delivery of curriculum instruction. Course content will focus on the assessment issues encountered when designing and delivering instruction. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite:  Students must have completed the methods courses in their major/minor field and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

401 THEORIES OF SECOND-LANGUAGE ACQUISITIONS 3

This course presents and overview of the field of SLA and on important research in Second Language Acquisition (SLA).  SLA research examines the ways in which human acquire additional languages.  In this course students will consider the way in which research on second language learning impacts classroom practice through targeted course observations in community classrooms.   Prerequisite:  Successful completion of PRAXIS I.

402 METHODS OF SECOND-LANGUAGE ACQUISITIONS 3

This course presents an overview of best practices in second-language teaching.  Students will examine existing books and approaches, both in Ochethi Sakowin and in other languages.  Students will prepare their own language lessons, exercises, and tests, and participate in micro-teaching sessions and evaluations in the classroom and in school settings.  Prerequisite:  EED 401 Theories of Second-Language Acquisition and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

403 OCHETHI SAKOWIN LANGUAGE PRACTICUM 1

This practicum provides the student with the opportunity to work alongside a Ochethi Sakowin language instructor in the classroom. The practicum is to be done in any pre K-12 classroom. During the practicum the student will develop and teach language lessons in the classroom. One semester hour of credit for a practicum is equivalent to forty-five (45) contact hours for a total of 45 contact hours for the course and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

447 MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION 3

This course provides pre-service and in-service teachers with an understanding of the importance of multiculturalism in our global society.  Topics to be addressed will include: learning styles and multiple intelligences; culturally-sensitive teaching strategies; recognizing prejudices, biases, and stereotypes in teaching materials and in our lives as teachers and learners; learning how to develop curricular materials with a multicultural approach; respecting human rights and diversity; and developing sensitivity to the values of individuals and groups that are not always personally shared and understood. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

450 READING THEORY AND PROCESS 3

This course is designed to give students knowledge of theory and procedures in the identification and remediation of reading.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite:  EED 330 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Elementary School and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

495 TEACHING READING IN THE CONTENT AREA 2

This course is designed for pre-service teachers and experienced teachers pursuing a reading credential who want to gain knowledge and skills in helping their students read content assignments with more understanding.  Strategies and techniques for teaching subject matter content and increase reading ability will be explained, demonstrated and practiced and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.  

497 STUDENT TEACHING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 12

This experience prepares candidates with the opportunity to observe, record, and assess children’s behavior in order to plan appropriate instructional programs and learning environments.  Candidates will write lesson plans and develop culturally appropriate integrated units that reflect learning styles, promote self-esteem, and encourage self-directed learning.  This experience provides opportunities for developing parent-teacher conferencing skills as well as working with parents and professionals in a collaborative manner.  It gives candidates the opportunity to assume complete responsibility of a classroom while under the supervision of a classroom teacher in an approved elementary or middle school and the college supervision of student teaching. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisites:  Senior status or consent of the instructor and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

498 SENIOR CAPSTONE 1

This course ensures that teacher candidates complete all Division of Education requirements prior to graduating from any Department of Education four-year teaching program. Requirements for this course include: attempt the PRAXIS II Exam for the specific program area, completion of an Oral Interview in front of a three-person committee, and completion and presentation of the Department of Education electronic portfolio. Candidates are required to take EED 498 concurrently with student teaching (ECE/EED/SED/SPED 497) and successful completion of the Praxis I Test.

499 EDUCATION SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

501 ADVANCED FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 3

This course examines the historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of education in the United States and addresses current and future societal and legal issues affecting education. It will provide an in depth examination of Ochethi Sakowin education and philosophy.

510 DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION 2

This course is designed to give candidates the theory and skills to create and teach lessons that are varied to meet the individual learning needs of students. Candidates will demonstrate proficiency in teaching the same curricula to all students by individualizing the complexity of the content, learning activities, and/or products.

520 MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION: THEORY & PRACTICE 3

This course examines multicultural education through historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations. It emphasizes the role of ethnicity in educational systems. It includes an overview of multicultural and multilingual curricula, exposure and understanding of various cultures, and culturally and linguistically responsive instructional and assessment techniques.

522 MODELS OF TEACHING & LEARNING 3

This course provides a comprehensive focus on teaching models.  Students will become familiar with teaching and learning contexts and identify models that may be used effectively in a given situation.   

525 CRITIQUE & DESIGN OF RESEARCH 2

This course focuses on the application and critique of research design in various educational disciplines. It provides an in-depth examination of quantitative and qualitative research approaches, sampling techniques, threats to validity, ethical considerations and reviewing, writing quantitative and qualitative methodology descriptions for research proposals and reports.

526 RESEARCH WRITING 1

This course covers basic research writing skills and requirements to write an effective APA formatted research paper or thesis.

527 STATISTICS 3

This course covers the fundamentals of modern statistical methods in the context of biology, social science and other areas of interest. Topics covered in this course include descriptive statistics, the binomial and normal distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing. The z, t, F, and chi-square test statistics ANOVA and some exposure to multi-variant analysis are included.

528 EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT 3

This course examines research theory and practice relevant to learning outcome assessments. It focuses on assessment strategies for students including developing the skills to select, score, and interpret educational assessments.

530 CURRICULUM DESIGN & CORE REQUIREMENTS 2

The course is designed to teach candidates to design, develop and evaluate curriculum to improve the instructional process and learning experiences. Topics include historical factors in society that influence curriculum, research regarding learning, models of curriculum design, methods of evaluation, and incorporating ethnic and cultural diversity into the curriculum planning process with specific emphasis on the Ochethi Sakowin cultures.

540 EDUCATION LAW & ETHICS 3

This course is designed as a beginning graduate level law course for educators. The topics to be studied include organizational structures of school, tribal, federal and state systems, church and state related issues, teacher rights, rights of students, instructional issues, tort liability, and equal opportunities in education.

550 ADVANCED INTERGRATION OF TECHNOLOGY INTO THE CLASSROOM 2

This course is an in depth study of ways to incorporate practical teaching strategies and instructional methods for integrating computers, the Internet, and other interactive technology. It focuses upon the day-to-day realities of classroom situations, provides instructional examples, and lesson ideas.

560 FIELD EXPERIENCE 1

This course is designed for students to utilize skills attained through prior coursework.  The field experience requires 15 hours of classroom instruction and 30 contact hours in a school setting working with students, staff, and stakeholders.  The field experience will take place during the time in which the candidate works on the thesis or scholarly project.  A variety of assessments will be used to determine performance of the field experience.

570 RESEARCH SEMINAR I 1

EED 570 is the first of two research courses in the thesis track.  The thesis is conducted in an area of interest of the candidate with advisor approval.  It is designed to provide the knowledge and skills in a variety of areas to strengthen personal, academic, and research competencies vital to the success in completing a research thesis.  A thesis is a systematic inquiry into an issue or phenomenon.  The candidate identifies an educational issue or phenomenon by investigating it and gathering, analyzing, and interpreting data.  This seminar will result in the completion of the thesis proposal, which includes an introduction, review of the literature, and methodology that are written in APA format.  Some of the requirements (e.g., collecting baseline data) for the field experience (EED 560) course may coincide with the data collection of the thesis.  

571 RESEARCH SEMINAR II 2

EED 571 is the second research course in the thesis track.  The candidate will have completed the thesis proposal that includes an introduction, review of the literature, and methodology (Chapter 1, 2, and 3).  EED 571 will entail the gathering, coding, analyzing, and interpreting of data findings.  It will include recommendations, summary of findings, and conclusions.  

572 RESEARCH PRESENTATION 1

Candidates will orally present to faculty their research methodology, findings, conclusions, and recommendations from their thesis in the form of an electronic presentation.

580 SCHOLARLY PROJECT SEMINAR I 1

EED 580 is the first of two courses in the scholarly project track.  The scholarly project is conducted in an area of interest of the candidate with advisor approval.  It is designed to provide the knowledge and skills in a variety of areas to strengthen personal, academic, and research competencies vital to the success in completing a scholarly project.  A scholarly project results in the candidate applying theory and empirical research to create a product (e.g., program, curriculum, or intervention) that is designed to address (e.g., solve, remediate, or improve) a practical educational problem.   The candidate identifies a problem, implements a product, compares data before and after the implementation of the product, and analyzes and interprets the comparative data findings.  This seminar will result in the completion of the scholarly project proposal, which includes an introduction, review of the literature, and methodology that are written in APA format.

581 SCHOLARLY PROJECT SEMINAR II 2

EED 581 is the second course in the scholarly project research track and will result in the completion of the project.  EED 581 will entail the gathering, coding, analyzing, and interpretation of data findings.

582 SCHOLARLY PROJECT PRESENTATION 1

Candidates will orally present to faculty their scholarly project methodology, findings, conclusions, and recommendations from their project in the form of an electronic presentation.  

MIDDLE SCHOOL (ME)

296 PHILOSOPHY & CURRICULUM OF MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION 3

This course focuses on education foundations appropriate to middle schools and essential to meeting the needs of adolescents.  It identifies and expands central ideas in the area of philosophy, historical background, curriculum, facilitation of learning, organizational practices, assessment, and planning.

 

299 MIDDLE SCHOOL SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

486 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL 1

This experience is intended to give pre-service and in-service teachers the opportunity to observe in a middle school setting, linking theory to practice in the middle school. The course consists of two components: a) orientation to the middle school environment b) observing experienced middle school teachers as well as students involved in the learning process. All participants must complete at least 20 hours of field experience. Prerequisite:  EED 330 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Elementary School and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

499 MIDDLE SCHOOL SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

SECONDARY EDUCATION (SED)

299 SECONDARY SCHOOL SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

390 SCHOOL SCIENCE SAFTEY 3

This course leads future teachers to investigate best practices in the area of classroom, laboratory and school safety and to make important decisions in the selection of methods and materials. Personal protective equipment, safety equipment, air quality, hazardous waste, chemical storage and labeling, liability issues, safety contracts and health issues will be among many areas that will be covered.  The course will be based on the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) publication: Exploring Safety–A Guide for Elementary, Middle School, and High School Teachers.  Prerequisites:  EED 250 Introduction to Education, EED 254 Classroom Management, EED 298 Pre-Professional Experience and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

400 METHODS AND MATERIALS OF SECONDARY SCIENCE EDUCATION 4

This course will explore various teaching methods and strategies along with the materials used to teach in secondary science education.  The course is designed to provide students with increased professional development through knowledge and skills in pedagogy.   Students will be required to develop lesson plans, projects, and teaching units that integrate inquiry based learning. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisites:  EED 250 Introduction to Education, EED 254 Classroom Management, EED 298 Pre-Professional Experience and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

497 STUDENT TEACHING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 12

Prepares secondary science candidates with the opportunity to observe, record, and assess learners’ behavior in order to plan appropriate instructional programs and learning environments.  Candidates will write lesson plans and develop culturally appropriate integrated units that reflect learning styles, promote self-esteem, and encourage self-directed learning. This course provides opportunities for developing parent-teacher conferencing skills as well as working with parents and professionals in a collaborative manner.  Candidates will have the opportunity to assume complete responsibility of a classroom while under the supervision of a classroom teacher in an approved secondary school and the college supervision of student teaching. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisite:  Senior status or consent of instructor and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

  

499 SECONDARY SCHOOL SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

SPECIAL EDUCATION (SPD)

200 EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 3

This course is an overview of special education, focusing on issues, concepts, and legal requirements related to the identification, assessment and provision of services to children with disabilities.  The etiology and characteristics of each exceptionality will be discussed. The impact of disability will be explored; learning process and related areas of cognitive, affective and psychomotor development.  In addition, this course will examine the importance of the child’s culture, family and community when developing and implementing an individual education program. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.

299 SPECIAL EDUCATION SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

300 TECHNIQUES OF MANAGING BEHAVIOR 4

This course focuses on demonstrating to potential teachers how to address classroom behaviors that occur while working with students with special needs and disabilities.  The course illustrates concepts that promote self-control, building self-esteem, considering environmental influences and ways to promote acceptable behavior.  The course will review effective theories and methods for classroom management that will promote success in students.  This course includes a field experience in special education classroom or elementary classroom with special education students included in the regular curriculum. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

310 INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES 4

This course will examine the education of persons with developmental disabilities. Topics will include handicapping conditions, legal aspects, history, parental perspectives, educational programming, service delivery, and current research.  This course includes a field experience in a special education classroom or an elementary classroom with special education students included in the regular curriculum. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

320 CURRICULUM AND RESOURCES IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY 3

This course addresses resources, issues and problems related to the field of special education.  It will focus on developing individual education programs with an emphasis in strategies and methods for including all children with disabilities in classroom environments appropriate to meet their needs.  Transition planning will be discussed as an integral part of designing individual education program. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

322 TEACHING CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH SEVERE INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY 4

This course will examine the current issues related to the field of teaching individuals with severe and multiple disabilities.  A goal of the course is to provide current information about individuals with severe and multiple disabilities, to examine strategies for effective service delivery and appropriate teaching methods and curriculum development for meeting the individualized needs of children and young adults with severe disabilities.  Strategies for collaboration with parents and other professionals in order to facilitate effective and meaningful programming will be discussed.  This course includes a field experience in a special education classroom or an elementary classroom with special education students included in the regular curriculum. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

324 TEACHING CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH MILD TO MODERATE INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY 4

This course will examine methods and strategies for teaching students with mild to moderate disabilities.  All curriculum and content areas will be discussed as they relate to meeting the individual learning needs of students with disabilities.  This course will explore the relationship of assessment, curricular adaptations, and instructional and environmental modification when designing appropriate educational programs for individual students.  Strategies for collaboration with parents and professionals in order to design and implement effective programming will also be examined.  Legal requirements will be reviewed for their impact in teaching and curriculum. This course includes a field experience in a special education classroom or an elementary classroom with special education students included in the regular curriculum. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Praxis I Test

328 COMMUNICATION WITH PARENTS AND PROFESSIONALS 3

This course examines communication and negotiation skills necessary for conferring and planning with parents, staff members, administrators, community, professional, and others concerning the academic, vocational, social, cognitive, language, and physical needs of children.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite:  SPD 200 Exceptional Children and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

420 SPECIAL EDUCATION ASSESSMENT 3

This course will provide an overview of assessment practices in special education programs.  This course will examine the purposes and uses of norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, and curriculum-based, observation-based and portfolio methods of assess in order to identify the needs of children who may have a disability.  The limitations of selected assessment practices and problems of interpretation will be addressed.  The course will also address how assessment is tied to program planning for children with disabilities.  The importance of active and meaningful participation of families in the assessment process will also be emphasized.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisites: SPD 322 Teaching Children and Youth with Severe Intellectual Disability, SPD 324 Teaching Child and Youth with Mild to Moderate Intellectual Disability and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

444 TRANSITION FOR SECONDARY STUDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY 3

This course provides the background required to understand the developmental and educational process that takes place from early adolescence through adulthood.  Prospective teachers will learn the policies and procedures needed to help students through the transition process, explore the roles of both schools and post-school professionals functioning within a team process.  The course will provide prospective teachers the background needed to meet the transition needs across the diverse populations of special education.  Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students. Prerequisite:  SPD 200 Exceptional Children and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

497 INTERNSHIP IN SPECIAL EDUCATION/INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY 12

Candidates will gain practical experience teaching children and youth with disabilities from the elementary through middle schools. Candidates will experience the multiple roles and responsibilities of being a special education teacher including preparing daily lessons, experimenting with different teaching strategies, consulting with regular classroom teachers, and participating in educational program planning. Special emphasis will be given regarding how this topic impacts Native American students.  Every effort will be made to place students in an environment that emphasizes cultural integration. Prerequisite:  Permission of Division of Education.   Prerequisites: Senior status or consent of the instructor and successful completion of the Praxis I Test

499 SPECIAL EDUCATION SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

DIVISION OF EGINEERING

ENGINEERING (ENGR)

115 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING PROFESSIONS w/CAD 4

This course is designed to introduce the profession of engineering, with its many types, to the students in particular the specific skills of computer aided design (CAD).  In addition the students will learn skills and techniques used by successful college students in engineering.  These topics will include study techniques, time management, test taking, note taking, goal setting, wellness, stress management, and career orientation with application to engineering.  The CAD activities will engage the student in the basic steps of engineering design and how it relates to the profession.  AutoCAD will be used as the introductory program to bring the potential of such programs to the awareness of students.  Prerequisite: CSCI 101 Introduction to Computers

204 SURVEYING 4

Measurements and errors; topographical and construction surveys; vertical and horizontal control methods; field exercises and computation techniques for surveying data; computation of earthwork volumes.

206 CIRCUIT ANALYSIS I 4

The study of linear circuits, component models, circuit laws, transient analysis, design rules, and CAD.  Prerequisites: MATH 129 Basic Linear Algebra  Co-requisite: PHYS 252 University Physics ll and MATH 166 Calculus ll

221 STATICS 3

Scalar and vector approaches to trusses, frames and machines internal forces, friction forces, center of gravity, centroid, and moment of inertia. Prerequisite:  Math 165 Calculus I or consent of the instructor.

222 DYNAMICS 3

This course provides students with a thorough presentation of the theory and application of dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Topics include the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies (translational and rotational), principles of work and energy, and principles of impulse and momentum. The motion of bodies under the action of forces is studies. Dynamics principles are basic to the analysis and design of moving structures subjected to shock load, to robotic devices, to automatic control systems, to rockets, missiles, space craft, vibration and machinery of all types with moving parts.  Prerequisite:  ENGR 221 Statics

224 THERMODYNAMICS 3

Introduction to thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Prerequisite:  ENGR 222 Dynamics or PHYS 252 University Physics II

DIVISION OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION

(HPER)

101 BEGINNING VOLLEYBALL 1

Fundamental rules and techniques are taught along with actual learning of skills and techniques during participation.

103 BEGINNING TENNIS 1

Fundamental techniques, scoring rules, and equipment care and selection are taught along with actual learning of skills and techniques during class participation.

105 AEROBICS 1

Exercise and techniques for posture, figure control and personal physical fitness are discussed and practiced.

106 OCHETHI SAKOWIN TRADITIONAL GAMES 2

This course will be an introduction to traditional Ochethi Sakowin games, including hand games.

110 WEIGHT LIFTING 1

Fundamental information concerning body metabolic processes and personal conditioning.  Emphasis is on coordination and muscle tone.

112 JOGGING/CONDITIONING 1

Fundamental information concerning normal physical development and the necessity for conditioning, sound health, proper respiration and weight control.

116 ARCHERY 2

This course involves learning terminology, safety habits for the sport, basic physical exercise for archery, as well as the fundamentals of longbow shooting.

117 CURLING I 1

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the sport of curling.  Curling terminology, rules of the game, and basic delivery and sweeping mechanics will be covered.

118 CURLING II 1

This course is designed to provide students with advanced education in the sport of curling.  Curling terminology and basic delivery and sweeping mechanics will be reviewed.  An introduction to curling strategy will be covered.  Prerequisite:  HPR 117 Curling I.

123 FUNDAMENTAL OF BASKETBALL 1

Basic techniques and skills involved in basketball.  There will be demonstrations and practices.

124 FUNDAMENTAL OF BOWLING 1

Fundamental rules, techniques, scoring, and terminology are taught along with actual learning of basic skills during practices games.

200 NUTRITION 2

Nutrition is the study of food, how it nourishes the body, and how it impacts health.  Students in this course study food nutrients and their actions as well as nutrient need changes throughout the life cycle.  The interaction between diet and health is explored.  Topics include nutritional guidelines and reading food labels.  Assessment of dietary intake and the influence of culture, values, and economics will be integrated.

205 HORSEMANSHIP PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2

This course shall demonstrate the basics of learning how to ride a horse while getting a good physical workout.  This course is an introduction to using horse riding and physical exercises associated with therapeutic uses of horsemanship. It will provide experience in using different types of physical activities, materials and various stretching techniques. Students will gain exposure to some theories of physical exercise, use of equipment and duration of techniques in horsemanship.

207 PREVENTION & CARE OF INJURIES 2

Methods of prevention and caring for the various types of injuries received in activities.

210 FIRST AID/CPR/AED 2

Instruction and laboratory practice in first aid procedures, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), automatic external defibrillator (AED), healthy lifestyles and prevention. Successful completion leads to a nationally recognized certification in CPR for adult, child, and infant; AED for adult and child; and First Aid for emergencies.

217 PERSONAL & COMMUNITY HEALTH 2

This course is designed to acquaint the student with those principles and practices which will ensure the maintenance of conditions necessary for wholesome personal and community living. Economic, social, and legal aspects of health preservation and disease prevention will be emphasized.

220 TRIBAL DIABETES EDUCATOR 2

This course will identify role of CHRs as health resource staff in American Indian communities; describe the meaning of health as understood by American Indian people; identify the extent of Type 2 diabetes in American Indian communities and the risk factors that contribute to the development of diabetes and its complications.

299 HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, & RECREATION SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE

MATHEMATICS (MATH)

099 COLLEGE MATH PREPARATION .4

The course covers the basic computations involved in working with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, squares, and other topics.  Laboratory required.

100 APPLIED MATH 3

A study of basic mathematics, enabling the student to gain math proficiency required for vocational programs.  Topics included are decimals, fractions, calculator use, and measurement.

101   PRE-ALGEBRA 3

This course covers properties and operations of numbers, equations, computation with positive and negative numbers, and graphs.

102 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4

Properties of the real number system, factoring, linear and quadratic equations, polynomial and rational expressions, inequalities, systems of equations, exponents, radicals, functional notation, rational equations and absolute value equations.  Prerequisite:  MATH 101 Pre-Algebra or placement test

103 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 4

Relations and functions, equations and inequalities, complex numbers; polynomial rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and systems of equations.  Graphing calculators are required.  Prerequisite: MATH 102 Intermediate Algebra or placement test

104 FINITE MATHEMATICS 3

Systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming mathematics of finance, elementary probability, and descriptive statistics.  Graphing calculators are required.  Graphing calculators are required.  Prerequisite: MATH 102 Intermediate Algebra or placement test

105 TRIGONOMETRY 3

Angle measure trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations, parametric polar coordinates, and general application.  Graphing calculators are required.  Prerequisite: MATH 102 Intermediate Algebra

107 PRECALCULUS 5

Equations and inequalities, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations and applications.  Graphing calculators are required.  Prerequisite: MATH 102 Intermediate Algebra

129 BASIC LINEAR ALGEBRA 2

Systems of linear equations, row operations, echelon form, matrix operations, inverses determinants, vectors in Euclidean space, vector spaces, subspaces, homogeneous systems, linear independence, rank, and dimension.  Prerequisite:  MATH 105 Trigonometry

146 APPLIED CALCULUS 3

Limits, derivatives, integrals, exponential and logarithmic functions, and applications.  Graphing calculator required.  Prerequisite:  MATH 103 or ACCUPLACER (placement) test

165 CALCULUS I 4

Limits, continuity, differentiation, Mean Value Theorem, integration, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and applications.   Graphing calculator required.  Prerequisite: MATH 105 Trigonometry or MATH 107 Precalculus

166 CALCULUS II 4   

Applications and techniques of integration, polar equations, parametric equations, sequences and series, power series and application.  Graphing calculator required.  Prerequisite:  MATH 165 Calculus I

265 CALCULUS III 4   

Multivariate and vector calculus including partial derivatives, multiple integration and its applications, line and surface integrals, Green’s Theorem and Stoke’s Theorem.  Perquisite:  MATH 166 Calculus II

210 ELEMENTARY STATISTICS 3   

An introduction to statistical methods of gathering, presenting and analyzing data.  Topics include probability and probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and linear regression and correlation.   Graphing calculator required.  Prerequisite:  MATH 102 Intermediate Algebra

266 INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3   

Solution of elementary differential equations by elementary techniques, Laplace transforms, systems of equations, matrix methods, numerical techniques and applications.  Prerequisite:  MATH 265 Calculus III or department approval

299 MATHEMATICS SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4

314 APPLIED STATISTICS 3

A continuation of MATH 210 Elementary Statistics.  Topics include normal distribution, z-scores, central limit theorem, estimation and confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, inferences about differences and chi-square distributions.  Graphing calculator required.  Prerequisite: MATH 103 College Algebra or approval of instructor

SCIENCES

BIOLOGY (BIOL)

111 CONCEPTS OF BIOLOGY 4

This is an introductory level course for non-science majors, and includes basic concepts in biology, natural history, and bio-social interactions.  Laboratory required.

150 GENERAL BIOLOGY I 4

A general course including major concepts concerning the cell, genetics, plant biology, basic human anatomy and physiology and ecological adaptation in plants and animals.  Laboratory required.  

151 GENERAL BIOLOGY II 4

A course in the biological sciences including expansion on the core principles of physiology, anatomy, genetics, ecology and other life processes in plants, vertebrates and invertebrates.  Laboratory required.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 150 General Biology I

170 ZOOLOGY 4

This course is the study of the evolution, identification, classification, anatomy, distribution, and behavior of species in Kingdom Animalia. The course examines the diversity of animals in terrestrial and aquatic habitats, with emphasis on common animal species of this region. Laboratory required.

202 MICROBIOLOGY 4

This course will familiarize students with the classification, recognition, characteristics, ecology, and positive and negative impacts of microorganisms. Emphasis is placed on understanding techniques to identify and control microorganisms. Laboratory required.  

220 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 4

A general survey of the function and anatomy of the human body.  The emphasis is on introductory topics of cell and tissue structure and function; anatomical terminology and integumentary; skeletal and muscular systems.  Laboratory required.   

224 GENERAL ECOLOGY 4

The course will be an introduction to the basic concepts of ecological theory as it is related to the world around us.  The examination of energy flow, nutrient cycles, and population ecology will form the basis of the course.  Laboratory required.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 150 General Biology I

230 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 4

A general survey of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis placed on reproductive and maintenance systems including circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, nervous, endocrine, lymphatic and reproductive.  Laboratory required.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 220 Anatomy and Physiology I

*240 ETHNOBOTANY 4

The course will focus on identification of culturally important plants at various stages of growth. Topics include traditional uses; harvesting, preparation and storage protocols; and English, Ochethi Sakowin, and scientific nomenclature. The course will examine habitat diversity—including optimal growth conditions, plant origins (native and invasive), and the interdependence of all organisms. Laboratory required.

258 BIRDS AND CULTURE 4

This course will focus on techniques used for identifying and studying bird species, written and oral histories about bird lore, and traditional uses of bird parts. Emphasis is placed on species with strong cultural significance. Laboratory exercises will be conducted indoors and outdoors. Laboratory required.

299 BIOLOGY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4

431 GRASSLAND ECOLOGY 3

This course will focus on factors such as soils, climate, and disturbance that developed the habitats of the Great Plains region. Students will study the biodiversity, plant ecology, animal ecology, and ecosystem processes of North American grasslands. Students will evaluate threats to grasslands such as invasive species, climate change, and habitat loss. Conservation and restoration efforts in grasslands will also be examined.

450 MAMMALOGY 3

This course is a study of the evolution, identification, classification, anatomy, distribution, behavior and ecology of mammals. Emphasis is placed on common species of this region, particularly grassland mammal species. Species with strong cultural significance such as buffalo, bear, and wolves will also be studied.

455 HERPETOLOGY 3

This course examines the biology of reptiles and amphibians (herpetiles). Students will study the evolution, identification, classification, anatomy, distribution, behavior, and ecology of reptiles and amphibians. Grassland and wetland species of this region will be the main focus of study. Emphasis is placed on cultural connections to herpetiles.

456 ORNITHOLOGY 3

This course is a study of the evolution, identification, classification, anatomy, distribution, behavior, and ecology of birds. Emphasis is placed on common bird species of this region, particularly grassland species. Species with strong cultural significance such as raptors and corvids will also be emphasized.

458 BIRDS AND CULTURE 4

This course will focus on techniques used for identifying and studying bird species, written and oral histories about bird lore, and traditional uses of bird parts. Emphasis is placed on species with strong cultural significance. Laboratory exercises will be conducted indoors and outdoors. Laboratory required.

499 BIOLOGY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4

CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

110 SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY 4

This course will cover the basic principles and concepts of inorganic, organic and biological chemistry.  Topics will include states of matter, measurements, elements, atoms and the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical equations, gases, liquids and solids, energy and equilibrium reaction, acid-base and oxidation reduction.  Organic topics include hydrocarbons, alcohol, ethers, esters, aldehydes and ketones.  Topics in biochemistry will include carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, liquids, amines, proteins, enzymes, and metabolism.   Laboratory required.  Prerequisites:  MATH 101 Pre-Algebra

115 INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY 4

This course will cover the basic principles and concepts of inorganic, organic and biological chemistry.   Topics will include states of matter, measurements, elements, atoms and the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical equations, gases, liquids and solids, energy and equilibrium, reactions, acid-base and oxidation-reduction.  Laboratory required.  Prerequisites:  MATH 101 Pre-Algebra

116 INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY 4

This course will cover the basic principles and concepts of organic and biological chemistry.  Organic topics include saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, alcohol, ethers, esters, aldehydes and ketones.  Topics in biochemistry will include carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, lipids, amines, proteins, enzymes, and metabolism.  Laboratory required.  Prerequisites:   CHEM 115 Introduction to Chemistry or CHEM 121 General Chemistry I, MATH 101 Pre-Algebra

121 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 4

This course will cover the basic principles and concepts of inorganic chemistry.  Topics will include states of matter, measurements, matter and energy, elements, atoms and periodic table, chemical reactions, chemical equations and properties of gases.  Laboratory required.  Prerequisite:  MATH 103 College Algebra

122 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 4

This course will cover the basic principles and concepts of inorganic chemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry.  Topics will include chemical bonding, liquids and solids, Solutions, acids and bases, chemical equilibrium, oxidation and reduction, nuclear chemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry.  Laboratory required.   Prerequisite:  CHEM 121 General Chemistry I

299 CHEMISTRY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4

*321 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY 3

This course will examine the chemical nature of air, water, and soil.  Some of the specific topics covered will include:  the ozone layer and ozone depletion, greenhouse effect, nutrient cycles, radiation, and acid rain.  The fate of chemicals in the environment will be studied.  Prerequisites:   ENS 113 Environmental Science I, CHEM 115 Introduction to Chemistry or CHEM 121 General Chemistry I, MATH 103 College Algebra

403 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 3

This course will introduce students to the use of advanced scientific analytical equipment.  This equipment will allow students to identify almost any element or chemical compound.  Students will be exposed to analyses using pH meter, conductivity meter, spectrophotometers, atomic absorption and graphite furnace.  They will also analyze samples using UV and IR spectrophotometers, HPLC, and gas chromatograph.  Students will learn techniques of sampling, sample preparation and storage.  Lab safety will be emphasized.  Prerequisites:  CHEM 115 Introduction to Chemistry, CHEM 121 General Chemistry I or CHEM 116 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry

499 CHEMISTRY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (ENS)

113 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 4

The course will be an introduction to environmental principles emphasizing the interrelationships between human cultures, organisms, and their environments.  Specifically, this course will examine environmental interrelatedness, environmental ethics, energy sources and issues, and human influences on ecosystems.  Laboratory required.

202 ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES 2

The course is a writing intensive course that will examine controversial issues that will inevitably shape future environmental legislation and the way we view the environment in which we live.  The Environmental Issues course will address environmental controversies from both ends of the continuum and allow students to form their own opinions on where they stand regarding the environment as it relates to economics, legislation, technology and human rights.  

*211 INTRODUCTION TO GIS/GPS 3

This course will teach students to use Geographical Information System software and Global Position System (GPS) technology.  Students will learn to collect waypoints using GPS technology and will download the waypoint data onto GIS mapping software.  Students will develop maps and enter attribute data to correspond to maps that are created.  This course will serve as a thorough introduction to GIS software and GPS technology.  Prerequisites:  CSCI 101 Introduction to Computers, MATH 103 College Algebra

216 WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION 4

The course will be an introduction to the management principles of wildlife as well as expose students to conservation practices that are used to enhance wildlife populations.  Predation, wildlife diseases, carrying capacity, and a history of wildlife management are topics that will be studied in depth throughout the semester.  The laboratory section of the course will allow students to use a hands-on approach to learning wildlife conservation principles.  Laboratory required.

225 ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING 4

The course will expand on introductory courses in environmental science and ecology.  Field samplings will allow students to understand the environment around them by using a hands-on approach.  Specifically, this course will allow students to examine water, air, and soil quality, as well as introduce students to the concepts of soil stratification, soil profiles, and examine how drinking water distribution systems operate. Prerequisites:  BIOL 224 General Ecology or CHEM 115 Introduction to Chemistry or CHEM 121 General Chemistry I, and ENS 113 Introduction to Environmental Science  

240 ENVIRONMENTAL STATISTICS 3

The course will introduce students to statistical methods that are important in ecological and environmental research. Quantitative analysis of data sets will be the primary focus of the course. Students will use actual data sets, utilizing statistical computer software, to calculate and interpret central tendencies, standard deviation, variance t-tests, chi square, confidence intervals, linear regression   Prerequisites:  MATH 101 Pre-Algebra

260 ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PROJECT I 2

This course will be an expansion of Introduction to Environmental Science (ENS 113) and General Ecology (BIOL 224).  Students will learn the scientific method of research using a hands-on approach.  Students that have chosen a concentration area in the Environmental Science Program will conduct an undergraduate research study that will be designed by the student with help from their major advisor.  Prerequisites:  ENS 113 Introduction to Environmental Science, BIOL 224 General Ecology

261 ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PROJECT II 2

This course will be an expansion of Environmental Research Project I (ENS 260).  Students that have chosen a concentration area in the Environmental Science Program will conduct an advanced undergraduate research study that will be designed by the student with help from their major advisor.  This course should be a culmination of all environmental science courses that the student has taken in their concentration area.  Prerequisite:  ENS 260 Environmental Research Project I

297 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE INTERNSHIP 1-3

This provides the student with the opportunity to experience environmental science in the work place in conjunction with their program of study.  One semester hour of credit is equivalent to forty-five (45) contact hours.  The internship experience will be conducted at an advisor-approved location that will provide the student with a quality educational and practical encounter in the field of environmental science.  Prerequisite:  Students through advisor approval will only be allowed to complete internship within the last two semesters of the Environmental Science degree plan.

299 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4

301 HYDROLOGY 3

This course will examine the hydrologic cycle and how it functions to transport water across Earth.  The study of surface flow and of groundwater flow will make up the major concentration of this course.  Quantitative methods will be used to determine water infiltration into soil, surface runoff rates, precipitation measurements, and water pressure.  Students will gain valuable knowledge in all areas of water transport through the environment.  Prerequisites:  ENS 113 Introduction to Environmental Science, CHEM 115 Introduction to Chemistry or CHEM 121 General Chemistry I, MATH 103 College Algebra

*311 INTRODUCTION TO GIS/GPS 3

This course will teach students to use Geographical Information System software and Global Position System (GPS) technology.  Students will learn to collect waypoints using GPS technology and will download the waypoint data onto GIS mapping software.  Students will develop maps and enter attribute data to correspond to maps that are created.  This course will serve as a thorough introduction to GIS software and GPS technology.  Prerequisites:  CSCI 101 Introduction to Computers, MATH 103 College Algebra

*321 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY 3

This course will examine the chemical nature of air, water, and soil.  Some of the specific topics covered will include:  the ozone layer and ozone depletion, greenhouse effect, nutrient cycles, radiation, and acid rain.  The fate of chemicals in the environment will be studied.  Prerequisites:   ENS 113 Introduction to Environmental Science I, CHEM 115 Introduction to Chemistry or CHEM 121 General Chemistry I, MATH 103 College Algebra

331 WILDLIFE CONSERVATION 3

This course is an advance study of the conservation and management of wildlife populations. Students will learn about population growth, population estimation, density effects, predation, conservation genetics and threats to wildlife species. Emphasis will be on how to use population and genetic data to manage wildlife. Emphasis will also be on habitat management and conservation. Prerequisites:  BIOL 224 General Ecology

422 ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY 3

This course will examine factors that influence the transport of contaminants and pollutants through environmental media of water, soil, and air.  The effects of chemical compounds on living organisms, particularly humans, will form the foundation of the course.  Routes of entry into organisms, as well as detoxification and toxin removal from living organisms will be discussed.  Methods of obtaining human exposure limits, and risk assessment will be examined.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 150 Biology I, CHEM 115 Introduction to Chemistry or CHEM 121 General Chemistry I, MATH 103 College Algebra

432 AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS 3

This course is designed to give students the basic understanding of the principles of aquatic ecosystems.  The ecological functioning, and the chemical and biological processes occurring in aquatic ecosystems will make up the main focus of the course.  Human impacts on aquatic ecosystems will be addressed in the course.  Prerequisites:   BIOL 224 General Ecology, CHEM 115 Introduction to Chemistry or CHEM 121 General Chemistry I, ENS 113 Introduction to Environmental Science, MATH 103 College Algebra

433 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT 3

This course will survey common biological, thermal, chemical, and physical waste stream methods.  A brief overview of the laws and regulations governing the treatment, storage, and disposal of solid waste, including hazardous waste, will be presented.  Some of the tools used to identify, track, minimize, and prevent solid waste generation will be discussed.  Case studies of selected waste minimization treatment and disposal techniques will be presented.  Prerequisite:  CHEM 115 Introduction to Chemistry or CHEM 121 General Chemistry I

434 AIR POLLUTION 3

The course will examine and explore current air pollution issues from a balanced perspective, along with history, regulatory development, air pollution sources and air pollution control. Areas of emphasis will include the cutting edge regulatory developments of greenhouse gas/global climate change, Clean Air Transport and control technology regulations, and health effects of pollutants. The course will allow for class participation and discussion of current controversies. Prerequisite:  CHEM 115 Introduction to Chemistry and ENS 113 Introduction to Environmental Science or consent of the instructor

*445 APPLYING OCHETHI SAKOWIN CULTURE TO NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 3

Students will learn more about Native American perspectives on environmental issues and natural resource management. Students will discuss the traditional and contemporary relationships between Native Americans and the environment. Focus will be on Dakota and Ochethi Sakowin culture.

452 SCIENCE LITERATURE 3

This course will prepare students to read scientific literature in an objective manner.  The interpretation of research published in journals will be the focal point of the course.  In addition, students will learn methods of writing research papers for publication.   Prerequisites:  ENGL 110 Composition I, MATH 103 College Algebra, ENS 240 Environmental Statistics or MATH 210 Elementary Statistics, BIOL150 General Biology I, BIOL 224 General Ecology

453 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW AND POLICY 3

This course examines major federal, state, and tribal laws that are in place to regulate activities that impact the environment.  Students will study the methods by which environmental laws are formed.  Students will be trained to use the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations to conduct research related to environmental issues.  Students will become familiar with the major environmental acts passed by the United State Congress that impact environmental decisions across the U.S.  Tribal law addressing environmental issues will be reviewed.  Prerequisite:  ENS 202 Environmental Issues  

493 SENIOR RESEARCH 1-3

This course will be a capstone for all senior students. Students will learn methods of conducting undergraduate research in the field of science. This course will expand on the 200-level research courses that student completed in the Associate of Science degree plan. Statistical analysis of data collected will be incorporated into this course. A final presentation to a board of SBC employees will be required of each student completing their research project.  Prerequisites:  Senior status and consent of the instructor

499 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4

500 GRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINAR 2

In this seminar the student will prepare, present, and critique scientific presentations. The student will present research proposals, talks for research conferences, and a practice thesis defense. Graduate students and faculty will lead seminar in discussion of various scientific topics.

511 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 3

This course, designed for first year graduate students, is an intensive lecture course to prepare students for conducting independent research.  The focus will be on the development of a quality research question, hypothesis testing, experimental design, and application of statistical methods.  Short-term research mini-projects will be conducted throughout the semester and used for demonstration of research methodologies.

515 ADVANCED STATISTICS 3

An advanced examination of statistics used in environmental science. Emphasis on specific applications and underlying assumptions, design of experiments, and observational schemes for research project. Linear, non-linear, and multivariate statistical analyses will be studied. Extensive computer analysis is employed, including Program-R and SAS.

520 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES IN GIS 3

This course will study the application and analysis of advanced techniques and principles of Geographic Information Systems and mapping to fully address spatial and time related problems related to resource management, urban site characterizations, hydrologic analyses, risk assessment, policy making, public health planning, disaster response, strategic defense techniques, range composition and condition, plant productivity, agriculture, and other applied fields. Prerequisite: ENS 311 Introduction to GIS/GPS or basic certification in GIS

522 ADVANCED REMOTE SENSING AND DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING 3

This course will introduce Remote Sensing and Image processing platforms. The application of the principles of Remote Sensing to integrate multiple interrelated data to map and analyze variations in spectral indices, electromagnetic energy and other remotely collected data will be emphasized. Remote sensing mapping and analysis will be used to solve temporal and spatial variation on surficial features. Remote sensing capabilities to address issues associated with spectral reflectance of vegetation, soil and water analysis, seasonal variability, and pollution issues will be addressed.  Prerequisite:  ENS 311 Introduction to GIS/GPS

530 LIMNOLOGY 3

This course will examine the physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes that occur within aquatic systems.  Lake and wetland origins, classifications, and habitats will be discussed in depth.  Natural and anthropogenic successional processes within aquatic systems will be covered.

  

532 WATERSHED ANALYSIS 3

This course is a conceptual and quantitative analysis of watershed processes with an emphasis on modeling surface water hydrology and water resources management.  The course will emphasize critical analysis of current hydrologic computational methods and hands-on use of watershed models.

542 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 3

This course will examine a comprehensive analysis of the relevant environmental theories and their application to the design of natural resources policy. The course will provide a presentation of principles, practices and key policy issues of natural resources management and planning.

*545 APPLYING OCHETHI SAKOWIN CULTURE TO NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 3

Students will learn more about Native American perspectives on environmental issues and natural resource management. Students will discuss the traditional and contemporary relationships between Native Americans and the environment. Focus will be on Dakota and Ochethi Sakowin culture.

550 CONSERVATION BIOLOGY 3

This course will examine the fundamental principles of ecology, evolution, and environmental sciences in the conservation, management and restoration of organisms and ecosystems. Students learn will about the five main threats to biodiversity and how to protect biodiversity from these specific threats.

552 AVIAN ECOLOGY 3

This course will focus on the ecology and conservation of bird species and avian communities. Students will learn how avian behavior, life history strategies, and species    interactions affect bird populations and communities. Students will learn how modern environmental change affects bird populations and what conservation measures can be taken to protect bird communities. Focus will be on local grassland, wetland, and forest bird communities.

554 GRASSLAND ECOLOGY 3

This course will focus on factors such as soils, climate, and disturbance that developed the habitats of the Great Plains region. Students will study the biodiversity, plant ecology, animal ecology, and ecosystem processes of North American grasslands.   Students will evaluate threats to grasslands such as invasive species, climate change, and habitat loss. Conservation and restoration efforts in grasslands will also be examined.

556 ECOLOGY OF INVASIVE SPECIES 3

This course will address the effects invasive, or nonindigenous, species have on ecosystems and economies. Invasive species are a growing threat to global biodiversity and negatively affect agriculture. Students will study the cause of invasions, ecological impacts, and evolutionary impact of invasive species. Students will examine possible solutions for the control and eradication of invasives. Focus will be on invasive species that impact local natural resources, cultural resources, and economies.

558 RESTORATION ECOLOGY 3

This course reviews ecosystem structure and function, and community and population processes in intact systems, along with the effects of major disturbances on natural systems. Restoration amendments will be discussed in terms of their effects on ecosystem structure and function. The course includes case studies, and focuses on plant, animal, and soil systems. Focus will be on grassland, riparian, and wetland restoration.

560 ADVANCED WATER AND SOIL BIOGEOCHEMISTRY 3

This course is an advanced coverage of aqueous geochemistry in terrestrial and aquatic systems including various chemical processes.  Applications of these principles will be demonstrated. Recitation will focus on current literature, applied problems, and case studies.

562 MICROBIAL ECOLOGY 3

This course will examine the ecological function of micro-organisms in the environment. Emphasis will be put on the relationships between microbes and the physical, chemical, and biotic components of their environments. The role of microbes in nutrient cycling, bioremediation, bio-control, biological waste treatment, fuel production, and energy recovery will be studied.

570 CLIMATE CHANGE 3

This course will examine the basic processes of the climate system. The course will study changing climate with emphasis on anthropogenic climate change. Various models for predicting future climate change will be presented, including the assumptions and uncertainties embedded in each model. The regional climate impacts and impacts on subsystems will be examined, including changes in rainfall patterns, loss of ice cover and changes in sea level. The possible ecological effects of these predicted changes will also be examined.

572 ENVIRONMENTAL WATER QUALITY 3

This is a general course introducing the topic of water quality.  The topics covered include a history of water quality management, global water resources and how they are used, developing standards, classification and environmental quality assessment, water and the hydrologic cycle, rivers and streams, groundwater, coastal zone water, lakes, wetlands, effects of land use. Management of water quality in different landscapes will be covered.  Laboratory work and field trips will be required.

580 ADVANCED WATER SAMPLING TECHNIQUES 3

This course focuses on water quality sampling, laboratory assessment, and data analyses. It includes surface water, groundwater, and pore water aspects. The course provides real-world, applied information for planning, evaluating, and implementing a water quality program. The course will emphasize critical analysis of current hydrologic computational methods and hands-on use of water quality models.

600 GRADUATE RESEARCH & THESIS 6-9

Student will work on research proposal or on research project. Number of credits taken each semester will be determined by graduate advisor and committee.

GEOLOGY (GEOL)

100 EARTH SCIENCE 4

This introductory lab course in physical geology covers the Earth, its structure, composition, and the geologic processes acting on and within the earth.  Special attention is given to the areas of meteorology, earth movements, and history.  Laboratory required.

105   INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 4

A study of geological processes such as erosion, volcanoes, earthquakes, mountain building, fossils, and origin of land forms.  Laboratory required.

121 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY 3

A study of the history of the Earth, including major geologic and biologic events.  Prerequisites:  GEOL 105 Introduction to Physical Geology, PALE 101 Introduction to Paleontology.

133 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY 4

This course is an introduction to processes involved in shaping the Earth. This course will focus primarily on how human activities impact the Earth’s physical environment. Specific topics include: rocks and minerals, streams and flooding, mass movement, water as a resource, soil as a resource, and pollution.

201 MINERALOGY AND PETROLOGY 3

This class is a study of rocks and minerals, their properties and how they relate to each other.  Prerequisite:  GEOL 101 Introduction to Physical Geology

221 SEDIMENTOLOGY AND STRATIGRAPHY 3

A study of sedimentary rocks, how they are formed and how to interpret them with respect to environment and geologic history of a region.  Prerequisites:  GEOL 121 Historical Geology, GEOL 201 Mineralogy and Petrology

243 ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE 4

This course is a study of the basic physical principles applied to the study of atmospheric phenomena.  Topics include the structure of the atmosphere, atmospheric motions, meteorological processes, air masses, fronts, weather map analysis, weather forecasting, and severe storms.  Laboratory required.  

299 GEOLOGY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4

499 GEOLOGY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4

PHYSICS (PHYS)

102   PHYSICAL SCIENCE 4

Elementary principles of physics, meteorology, chemistry, geology, and astronomy.  Laboratory required. Prerequisite:  MATH 101 Pre-Algebra

110 ASTRONOMY 4

This course is an introduction to astronomy, which covers the operations and functions of a telescope, star charting, the solar system, planets, stars and the universe.  Laboratory required.  Prerequisite:  MATH 101 Pre-Algebra

211 COLLEGE PHYSICS I 4

This is the first semester course in physics for students without a calculus background.  The course will cover topics relative to Newton’s Laws of Motion. These will include describing motion, falling objects and projectile motion, explaining motion, circular motion, the planets and gravity, energy and oscillations, momentum and impulse, and the rotational motion of solid objects.   Laboratory required. Prerequisite:  MATH 101 Pre-Algebra   

212 COLLEGE PHYSICS II 4

This is the second semester course in physics for students without a calculus background. The course will cover topics in fluids and heat, heat engines and thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, wave motion and optics, radiation, atomic spectra, quantum mechanics, nuclear chemistry and relativity.  Laboratory required.  Prerequisite: PHYS 211 College Physics I

251 UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I 4

This course will cover the basic principles and concepts of Newtonian mechanics.  Topics will include translational and rotational motion, work, energy, power, momentum, conservation of energy and momentum, periodic motion, waves, sound, heat, and thermodynamics.  Laboratory required.  Prerequisite:  MATH 165 Calculus I or consent of the instructor

252 UNIVERSITY PHYSICS II 4

This course will cover the basic principles and concepts of electricity, magnetism and modern physics.  Topics will include electricity, circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics, relativity, photons and matter, nuclear physics, quarks, leptons and the Big Bang.  Laboratory required.  Prerequisites:  PHYS 251 University Physics I     Co-Requisite: ENGR 222 Dynamics

299 PHYSICS SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4

499 PHYSICS SPECIAL TOPICS 1-4

DIVISION OF NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES

LAKHOTIYAPI/DAKHOTIYAPI (LDL)

101 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL I METHODS A 1

This course, which is an intensive practical overview of teaching Ochethi Sakowin language, will emphasize introducing and reinforcing vocabulary with flashcards, props, and Total Physical Response (TPR) methods.  The course will also address classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles.

102 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL II METHODS A 1

This course, which is an intensive practical overview of teaching Ochethi Sakowin language, will emphasize Ochethi Sakowin phonetics and pronunciation along with simple interrogative sentences.  The course will also address classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles.

103 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL III METHODS A 1

This course, which is an intensive practical overview of teaching Ochethi Sakowin language, will emphasize methods to teach Ochethi Sakowin verbs (first, second, and third person) and tense (past, present, and future).  The course will also address classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles. Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor.

104 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL IV METHODS A 1

This course, which is an intensive practical overview of teaching Ochethi Sakowin language, will stress methods to teach Ochethi Sakowin intermediate conjugation of verbs.  Reading, writing, and critical thinking in Ochethi Sakowin are emphasized.  The course will also address classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles. Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor.

105 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL V METHODS A 1

This course is an intensive practical overview of teaching Ochethi Sakowin language using basic communicative language methods.  The course emphasizes the use of organizers, schema, and contextualized exercises.  The course will also address classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles. Prerequisite:  Consent of the instructor.

106 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL I & II METHODS A 1

This accelerated course emphasizes Level I concepts of introducing and reinforcing vocabulary and Total Physical Response (TPR) method and Level II concepts of Ochethi Sakowin phonetics and pronunciation along with simple interrogative sentences.  The course will also address classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles. This course is not as in depth as LDL 101 and 102.

107 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL III & IV METHODS A 1

This accelerated course emphasizes Level III methods to teach Ochethi Sakowin verbs (first, second, and third person) and tense (past, present, and future) and Level IV methods to teach Ochethi Sakowin intermediate conjugation of verbs; reading, writing and critical thinking in Ochethi Sakowin.  The course will also address classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles. This course is not as in depth as LDL 103 and 104.

108 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN GRAMMAR I 1

This course introduces practical and theoretical knowledge of Ochethi Sakowin grammar, the conjugation patterns, and syntactical structure of Ochethi Sakowin verbs, and the basic rules of word order in Ochethi Sakowin sentences. This course provides the student with a foundation to become a more self-reliant learner as well as teacher.

110 OCHETHI SAKOWIN PHONOLOGY I 1

This course is the primary linguistic introduction to the Ochethi Sakowin phonetic system (i.e. its sounds and writing system).  Emphasis will be on an overview of the Ochethi Sakowin phonetic system and consistency in writing the language.  Special emphasis will be on developing a basic technical linguistic understanding of Ochethi Sakowin phonology, the issues and difficulties associated with English speakers learning these sounds, and developing a professional approach to teaching these concepts.  The use of specialized fonts and keyboard software will also be covered.

121 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR BEGINNERS I 1

This course is designed for second language learners of Ochethi Sakowin who are at a beginner level.  It is part one of a three course continuum.  It will give an overview of Ochethi Sakowin pronunciation and how to use an Ochethi Sakowin dictionary for self-learning.  The course will focus on demonstratives, pronunciation, numbers, kinship terms, body parts, verbs of possession and coming and going, and time in Ochethi Sakowin (past, present, future and seasonal). Students will be exposed to various self-learning skills and strategies in order to become active self-learners of the language.

122 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR BEGINNERS II 1

This course will build on LDL 121 and will focus on language used for expressing time in Ochethi Sakowin (habitual events, specific events in the past, non-specific events in the past, future or potential events, asking “when”). Other topics include the concept of “can” and “want” in Ochethi Sakowin; two verb constructions; relative clauses for describing people, animals and objects; direct speech and reported speech; Ochethi Sakowin counterparts for the English word “think”, and many other frequent and common aspects of Ochethi Sakowin vocabulary, structure, and usage. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

123 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR BEGINNERS III 1

This course will build on LDL 122 and will focus on conditional clauses, indirect questions, postpositions, and T-words (question words). The course will review animal vocabulary (body parts, describing animals, animal activities etc.) with the aim of using the topic of traditional animals for practicing various sentence patterns and communicative situations. Students will be introduced to frequency adverbs, usages of common verbs, and the difference between commands and reported commands. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

124 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR ELEMENTARY I 1

This course is the first of a three course continuum and is designed for second language learners of Ochethi Sakowin between the beginner and pre-intermediate levels.  The course will build on the foundations of LDL 123.

125 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR ELEMENTARY II 1

This course is the second of a three course continuum and is designed for second language learners of Ochethi Sakowin between the beginner and pre-intermediate levels.  The course will build on the foundations of LDL 124 by introducing reading and writing simple texts.

126 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR ELEMENTARY III 1

This course is the last of a three course continuum and is designed for second language learners of Ochethi Sakowin between the beginner and pre-intermediate levels. This course, through the use of communicative situations, will focus on creating and practicing the various Ochethi Sakowin vocabulary, structure, sentence and language patterns and usage introduced in LDL 124 -125.

201 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL I METHODS B 1

This course is an intensive practical review of teaching methods for language acquisition, and is both a refresher of “best practices” in teaching and a discussion of new advanced methods. The course will also address advanced classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles.  Prerequisite:  LDL 101 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level I Methods A or consent of the instructor

202 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL II METHODS B 1

This course is an intensive practical overview of teaching Ochethi Sakowin language and will review methods used to teach phonetics and pronunciation along with simple interrogative sentences.  The course will also address advanced classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles.  Prerequisite:  LDL 102 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level II Methods A or consent of the instructor

203 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL III METHODS B 1

This course is an intensive practical overview of teaching Ochethi Sakowin language using communicative language teaching methods and will review methods introduced to teach verbs (first, second, and third person) and tense (past, present, and future).  The course will also address advanced classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles. Prerequisite:  LDL 103 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level III Methods A or consent of the instructor

204 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL IV METHODS B 1

This course is an intensive practical overview of teaching Ochethi Sakowin language using communicative language teaching methods.  Teaching intermediate conjugation of verbs will be stressed, as well as reading, writing and critical thinking in Ochethi Sakowin. Prerequisite:  LDL 104 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level IV Methods A or consent of the instructor

205 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL V METHODS B 1

This course is an intensive practical overview of teaching Ochethi Sakowin language using advanced communicative language methods.  The course emphasizes the use of advanced organizers, schema, and contextualized exercises to teach reading and writing skills and grammar.  The course will also address classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles. Prerequisite:  LDL 105 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level V Methods A

206 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL I & II METHODS B 1

This accelerated course is both a refresher of “best practices” in teaching and a discussion of new advanced methods.  The course reviews methods used to teach phonetics and pronunciation along with simple interrogative sentences.  The course also covers advanced classroom management techniques for the language classroom, as well as the use of different teaching modalities to address diverse learning styles. This course is not as in depth as LDL 201 and 202. Prerequisite:  LDL 106 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level I & II Methods A or consent of the instructor

207 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEVEL III & IV METHODS B 1

This accelerated course focuses on the use of communicative language teaching methods.  The course emphasizes the Level III methods of verbs (first, second and third person) and tense (past, present, and future); the Level IV methods of intermediate conjugation of verbs; and reading, writing and critical thinking in Ochethi Sakowin.  This course is not as in depth as LDL 203 and 204. Prerequisite:  LDL 206 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level I & II Methods A or consent of the instructor

208 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN GRAMMAR II 1

This course is the primary linguistic introduction to Ochethi Sakowin grammar, its inflectional and derivational morphology and syntax, including the associated rules, and introduces the pedagogical approaches to explaining this grammar. Prerequisite: LDL 108 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Grammar I or consent of the instructor

210 OCHETHI SAKOWIN INFLECTIONAL MORPHOLOGY I 1

This course introduces the use of Ochethi Sakowin morphology so that students are adept at preparing lesson plans and teaching classes using grammatical concepts. Prerequisite: LDL 110 Ochethi Sakowin Phonology I or consent of the instructor

211 OCHETHI SAKOWIN SYNTAX I 1

This course offers an introduction to Ochethi Sakowin sentence structure and syntax, providing the foundation needed to understand and introduce sentence structures. Prerequisite: LDL 210 Ochethi Sakowin Inflectional Morphology I or consent of the instructor

212 OCHETHI SAKOWIN PHONOLOGY II 1

This course is a continuation of Ochethi Sakowin /Dakota phonology and pedagogical approaches to teaching correct pronunciation. Prerequisite: LDL 110 Ochethi Sakowin Phonology I

221 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR PRE-INTERMEDIATES I 1

This course will focus on Ochethi Sakowin verbs of bringing and taking; causative verbs; expressing alienable (material things) and inalienable (kinship, body parts) possession; an introduction to the semantics of the 1st and 2nd datives; and an introduction to reflexive and reciprocal verbs.  Reading and writing texts with introduced vocabulary and structures will be required. Prerequisite: LDL 126 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Elementary III or consent of the instructor

222 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR PRE-INTERMEDIATES II 1

This course focuses on Ochethi Sakowin reading, writing, and dialogues, including activities with transitives, possessives, datives, benefactives and reflexives, kinship terms, and time clauses. Prerequisite: LDL 221 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Pre-Intermediates I or consent of the instructor

223 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR PRE-INTERMEDIATES III 1

This course will focus on expressing changes of state and continuity in Ochethi Sakowin; postposition of place and movement; introduction and use of adverbs; relative and complement clauses; expressing emotions and opinions; functional vocabulary; and verbs expressing “decide”. Prerequisite: LDL 222 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Intermediates II or consent of the instructor

231 IMMERSION METHODS I 1

This course offers theoretical insights and practical training in various immersion strategies, activities, and approaches in preschool through first grade classrooms.

232 IMMERSION METHODS II 1

This course offers theoretical insights and practical training in various immersion strategies, activities, and approaches in second grade classrooms. Prerequisite: LDL 231 Immersion Methods I or consent of the instructor

233 IMMERSION METHODS III 1

This course offers theoretical insights and practical training in various immersion strategies, activities, and approaches in third grade classrooms. Prerequisite: LDL 232 Immersion Methods II or consent of the instructor

240 PROCESS WRITING I 1

This course provides an introduction to the methods of process writing as an approach to creating texts in various genres, developing a literary style, and broadening the expression of ideas and concepts in Ochethi Sakowin.  

241 OCHETHI SAKOWIN READING I 1

This course provides a basic introduction to the structure of traditional Ochethi Sakowin narratives and how texts can be used in the classroom.

242 DISCURSIVE NARRATIVE & RECORDING I 1

This course provides students with the opportunity to create and record a narrative in Ochethi Sakowin.  

243 FIELD METHODS/TRANSCRIPTION I 1

This course is designed to teach effective field methods for recording native speakers and transcription. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

250 INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE I 1

This course is an introductory survey of indigenous language loss, focusing on current best practices for revitalization.

 

251 OCHETHI SAKOWIN SONG & DANCE 1

This course will provide an introduction to the song and dance of the Ochethi Sakowin.  

252 NORTHERN PLAINS SIGN LANGUAGE 1

This course offers an intensive practical introduction to the history and use of Plains Indian Sign Language (PISL).  

Prerequisite:  LDL 206 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level I & II Methods A or consent of the instructor

208 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN GRAMMAR II 1

This course is the primary linguistic introduction to Ochethi Sakowin grammar, its inflectional and derivational morphology and syntax, including the associated rules, and introduces the pedagogical approaches to explaining this grammar. Prerequisite: LDL 108 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Grammar I or consent of the instructor

210 OCHETHI SAKOWIN INFLECTIONAL MORPHOLOGY I 1

This course introduces the use of Ochethi Sakowin morphology so that students are adept at preparing lesson plans and teaching classes using grammatical concepts. Prerequisite: LDL 110 Ochethi Sakowin Phonology I or consent of the instructor

211 OCHETHI SAKOWIN SYNTAX I 1

This course offers an introduction to Ochethi Sakowin sentence structure and syntax, providing the foundation needed to understand and introduce sentence structures. Prerequisite: LDL 210 Ochethi Sakowin Inflectional Morphology I or consent of the instructor

212 OCHETHI SAKOWIN PHONOLOGY II 1

This course is a continuation of Ochethi Sakowin /Dakota phonology and pedagogical approaches to teaching correct pronunciation. Prerequisite: LDL 110 Ochethi Sakowin Phonology I

221 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR PRE-INTERMEDIATES I 1

This course will focus on Ochethi Sakowin verbs of bringing and taking; causative verbs; expressing alienable (material things) and inalienable (kinship, body parts) possession; an introduction to the semantics of the 1st and 2nd datives; and an introduction to reflexive and reciprocal verbs.  Reading and writing texts with introduced vocabulary and structures will be required. Prerequisite: LDL 126 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Elementary III or consent of the instructor

222 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR PRE-INTERMEDIATES II 1

This course focuses on Ochethi Sakowin reading, writing, and dialogues, including activities with transitives, possessives, datives, benefactives and reflexives, kinship terms, and time clauses. Prerequisite: LDL 221 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Pre-Intermediates I or consent of the instructor

223 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR PRE-INTERMEDIATES III 1

This course will focus on expressing changes of state and continuity in Ochethi Sakowin; postposition of place and movement; introduction and use of adverbs; relative and complement clauses; expressing emotions and opinions; functional vocabulary; and verbs expressing “decide”. Prerequisite: LDL 222 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Intermediates II or consent of the instructor

231 IMMERSION METHODS I 1

This course offers theoretical insights and practical training in various immersion strategies, activities, and approaches in preschool through first grade classrooms.

232 IMMERSION METHODS II 1

This course offers theoretical insights and practical training in various immersion strategies, activities, and approaches in second grade classrooms. Prerequisite: LDL 231 Immersion Methods I or consent of the instructor

233 IMMERSION METHODS III 1

This course offers theoretical insights and practical training in various immersion strategies, activities, and approaches in third grade classrooms. Prerequisite: LDL 232 Immersion Methods II or consent of the instructor

240 PROCESS WRITING I 1

This course provides an introduction to the methods of process writing as an approach to creating texts in various genres, developing a literary style, and broadening the expression of ideas and concepts in Ochethi Sakowin.  

241 OCHETHI SAKOWIN READING I 1

This course provides a basic introduction to the structure of traditional Ochethi Sakowin narratives and how texts can be used in the classroom.

242 DISCURSIVE NARRATIVE & RECORDING I 1

This course provides students with the opportunity to create and record a narrative in Ochethi Sakowin.  

243 FIELD METHODS/TRANSCRIPTION I 1

This course is designed to teach effective field methods for recording native speakers and transcription. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

250 INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE I 1

This course is an introductory survey of indigenous language loss, focusing on current best practices for revitalization.

 

251 OCHETHI SAKOWIN SONG & DANCE 1

This course will provide an introduction to the song and dance of the Ochethi Sakowin.  

252 NORTHERN PLAINS SIGN LANGUAGE 1

This course offers an intensive practical introduction to the history and use of Plains Indian Sign Language (PISL).  

253 AUDIO MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT I 1

This course provides students with the capacity to develop their own audio-based teaching recordings that encourage active participation over rote memorization. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

254 OCHETHI SAKOWIN POETRY 1

This course will introduce the learner to various poetic traditions, challenge the learners to write poems as a group, and enhance learner vocabulary in the target language.

303 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN III METHODS C 1

This course, intended for students with several years of experience in language teaching, focuses on the application of advanced teaching methods for Ochethi Sakowin language, with emphasis on verbs, tense, and writing sentences. Prerequisite: LDL 203 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level III Methods B or consent of the instructor

304 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN IV METHODS C 1

This course, intended for students with several years of experience in language teaching, focuses on the application of advanced teaching methods for Ochethi Sakowin language, with emphasis on intermediate conjugation of verbs, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: LDL 204 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level IV Methods B or consent of the instructor

305 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN V METHODS C 1

This course, intended for students with several years of experience in language teaching, focuses on the application of advanced teaching methods for Ochethi Sakowin language, with emphasis on teaching reading and writing skills and grammar through the use of advanced organizers, schema, and contextualized exercises. Prerequisite: LDL 205 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level V Methods B or consent of the instructor

306 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN I & II METHODS C 1

This accelerated course, intended for students with several years of experience in language teaching, focuses on the Level I concepts applying advanced teaching methods with emphasis on verbs, tense, and writing sentences and Level 2 concepts of introducing Ochethi Sakowin phonetics and pronunciation along with simple interrogative sentences.  This course is not as in depth as LDL 302. Prerequisite: LDL 206 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level I & II Methods B or consent of the instructor

307 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN III & IV METHODS C 1

This accelerated course, intended for students with several years of experience in language teaching, focuses on the application of advanced teaching methods.  The course emphasizes the Level III methods for intermediate conjugation of verbs, reading, and writing and the Level IV methods for grammar through the use of advanced organizers, schema, and contextualized exercises.  Reading, writing and critical thinking in Ochethi Sakowin are emphasized.  This course is not as in depth as LDL 303 or LDL 304. Prerequisite: LDL 207 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Level III & IV Methods B or consent of the instructor

308 TEACHING OCHETHI SAKOWIN GRAMMAR III 1

This course teaches grammar rules in the context of everyday conversations and traditional narratives. The course also covers a comparison of colloquial and formal grammar. Prerequisite: LDL 208 Teaching Ochethi Sakowin Grammar II or consent of the instructor

310 DAKOTA/OCHETHI SAKOWIN INFLECTIONAL MORPHOLOGY II 1

This course introduces advanced Ochethi Sakowin inflection morphology and morphological irregularities. Prerequisite: LDL 210 Ochethi Sakowin Inflectional Morphology I or consent of the instructor

311 OCHETHI SAKOWIN SYNTAX II 1

This course is a comprehensive overview of various types of clauses, noun phrases, topic and comment structures, noun incorporation in verbs, conjunctions, and postpositional phrases. Prerequisite: LDL 211 Ochethi Sakowin Syntax I or consent of the instructor

321 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR INTERMEDIATES I 1

The course continues to develop speaking, listening, comprehension, reading and writing skills. Areas covered include expression of Ochethi Sakowin verbs “be, do, act, decide, ask, think, want” etc.; expression of purpose, reason, result and contrast; continuation of an action; and coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. Prerequisite: LDL 223 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Pre-Intermediates III or consent of the instructor

322 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR INTERMEDIATES II 1

The course continues to develop speaking, listening, comprehension, reading, and writing skills. Areas covered include a comparison of language for making plans, decisions, and hopes; and if-clauses. Prerequisite: LDL 321 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Intermediates I or consent of the instructor

323 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR INTERMEDIATES III 1

The course continues to develop speaking, listening, comprehension, reading, and writing skills. Areas covered include time clauses; comparative and superlative of attributive stative verbs; the use of tkȟá for expressing the meaning of “used to”; and complex forms of verbal conjugation. Prerequisite: LDL 322 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Intermediates II or consent of the instructor.

330 IMMERSION METHODS IV 1

This course offers theoretical insights and practical training in various immersion strategies, activities, and approaches in upper elementary classrooms. Prerequisite: LDL 233 Immersion Methods III or consent of the instructor

331 IMMERSION METHODS V 1

This course offers theoretical insights and practical training in various immersion strategies, activities, and approaches.  This segment focuses on the practical implementation of Task-based Language Learning Teaching (TBLT). Prerequisite: LDL 330 Immersion Methods IV or consent of the instructor

332 IMMERSION METHODS VI 1

This course offers theoretical insights and practical training in various immersion strategies, activities, and approaches.  This segment focuses on the practical implementation of Cooperative Learning using Multiple Intelligences. Prerequisite: LDL 331 Immersion Methods V or consent of the instructor

340 PROCESS WRITING II 1

This course continues development of process writing skills in Ochethi Sakowin.  This course will review the stages of process writing and introduce peer editing. Prerequisite: LDL 240 Process Writing I

341 OCHETHI SAKOWIN READING II 1

This course offers an in-depth examination of reading as a method of learning and teaching a second language. The course focuses on assessing reading ability; building comprehension; and the relationship between readings skills and general language competence. Prerequisite: LDL 241 Ochethi Sakowin Reading I

342 DISCURSIVE NARRATIVE & RECORDING II 1

This course is a continuation of methods for creating and recording narrative in Ochethi Sakowin.  Additional genres and styles of audio/visual recorded narration will be introduced and students will critique those and create their own narration. Prerequisite: LDL 242 Discursive Narrative & Recording I

343 FIELD METHODS/TRANSCRIPTION II 1

This course further develops field methods used in documenting endangered languages, particularly to the ways of recording texts in an audio format and transcribing them into a written format. The course offers theoretical background in corpus linguistics with a main focus on practical steps and skills required for transcribing audio texts. Prerequisite: LDL 243 Field Methods/Transcription I or consent of the instructor

350 NEOLOGISM DEVELOPMENT I 1

This course focuses on the process of creating new vocabulary and expressions in Ochethi Sakowin, through exploration and identification of the traditional methods employed in Ochethi Sakowin word development. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

351 CLASSROOM MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT I 1

This course is designed to provide opportunities for the development of skills and strategies needed to integrate computer technology into the curriculum throughout all disciplines and all grades.  The use of Publisher, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint is incorporated extensively throughout this course. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

353 VIDEO MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT I 1

This course is a practical language video development course that exposes students to best practices in planning, scripting, acting, transcription, and translation associated with short language-learning videos. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

354 TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT I 1

This course is an introduction to Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL).  Areas of instruction incorporated in this course include: Electronic Flashcards systems and the Leitner System. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

355 DAKOTA MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT I 1

This course offers an introduction to Dakota Material Development and examines the process of translation from one dialect to another within the dialects of the language. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

410 OCHETHI SAKOWIN INFLECTIONAL MORPHOLOGY III 1

This course covers advanced inflectional morphology and morphological irregularities. Topics covered include:  verb valence, derivational morphology, and verbs of coming and going. Prerequisite: LDL 310 Ochethi Sakowin Inflectional Morphology II or consent of the instructor

411 OCHETHI SAKOWIN SYNTAX III 1

This course covers advanced syntax, including complex syntactic constructions, uses of passive voice, and the position of agent and patient. Prerequisite: LDL 311 Ochethi Sakowin Syntax II or consent of the instructor

421 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR ADVANCED-INTERMEDIATES I 1

The course extends the proficiency and fluency achieved in the previous courses. Areas covered include various means of expressing ‘as if’ and ‘as’; adverbials such as location, direction, manner, and degree; and headless relative clauses. Prerequisite: LDL 323 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Intermediates III or consent of the instructor

422 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR ADVANCED-INTERMEDIATES II 1

The course extends the proficiency and fluency achieved in the areas of adverbials of time, duration, frequency, and probability; connecting adverbs and negative adverbs; and reduplication on adverbs. Prerequisite: LDL 421 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Advanced-Intermediates I or consent of the instructor

423 INTENSIVE OCHETHI SAKOWIN FOR ADVANCED-INTERMEDIATES III 1

The course extends the proficiency and fluency achieved by creating communicative situations in which the students can practice using lexical and structural items and semantic domains.  The course introduces generic nouns. Prerequisite: LDL 422 Intensive Ochethi Sakowin for Advanced-Intermediates II or consent of the instructor

430 IMMERSION METHODS VII 1

This course focuses on developing a Ochethi Sakowin immersion curriculum and model lessons for K-4 classrooms in the areas of natural science, social studies, art, math, and technology. The course uses the three main principles of language teaching. Prerequisite: LDL 332 Immersion Methods VI or consent of the instructor

431 IMMERSION METHODS VIII 1

This course focuses on developing a Ochethi Sakowin immersion curriculum and model lessons for 5-8 classrooms in the areas of natural science, social studies, art, math, and technology. The course uses the three main principles of language teaching. Prerequisite: LDL 430 Immersion Methods VII or consent of the instructor

432 IMMERSION METHODS IX 1

This course focuses on developing a Ochethi Sakowin immersion curriculum and model lessons for 9-12 classrooms in the areas of natural science, social studies, art, math, and technology. The course uses the three main principles of language teaching. Prerequisite: LDL 431 Immersion Methods VIII or consent of the instructor

440 OCHETHI SAKOWIN DRAMA/PERFORMANCE I 1

This course focuses on adapting a story into a Ochethi Sakowin language screen play using theater script format. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

441 OCHETHI SAKOWIN DRAMA/PERFORMANCE II 1

This course focuses on acting and directing using a play written for performance in Ochethi Sakowin. Topics and activities include cast roles, set design, and rehearsal. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

442 OCHETHI SAKOWIN DRAMA/PERFORMANCE III 1

This course focuses on production and performance of the play adapted in LDL 441. Emphasis is placed on flow, timing, and staging. Prerequisite: LDL 441 Ochethi Sakowin Drama/Performance I or consent of the instructor

450 NEOLOGISM DEVELOPMENT II 1

This course expands upon the word-development/coinage skills learned in LDL 350 to address more complex lexical and contextual semantic domains.  Using traditional Ochethi Sakowin word-development methods, students will apply learned techniques to develop comprehensive and technically-precise medical, technical, scientific, industrial, and commercial vocabulary and expressions. Prerequisite: LDL 350 Neologism Development I or consent of the instructor

451 CLASSROOM MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT II 1

This course applies technology to create Ochethi Sakowin materials for all disciplines and grades. The use of social media and video and audio components is incorporated. Prerequisite: LDL 351 Classroom Materials Development I

452 AUDIO MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT II 1

This course focuses on developing advanced instructional audio recordings based on leading methods and theories. Prerequisite: LDL 352 Audio Materials Development I

453 VIDEO MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT II 1

This course focuses on developing advanced instructional video recordings based on leading methods and theories. Prerequisite: LDL 353 Video Materials Development I

454 TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT II 1

This course focuses on the adaptation of existing technology to enhance the teaching and learning of the Ochethi Sakowin language. Prerequisite: LDL 354 Technology Development I

455 DAKOTA MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT II 1

This course offers advanced instruction in transliteration of educational materials to the Dakota dialect. Prerequisite: LDL 355 Dakota Material Development I

456 NEOLOGISM DEVELOPMENT III 1

This course focuses on the process of creating new Ochethi Sakowin vocabulary and expressions through exploration and identification of the traditional methods of word development. This course will further utilize and expand upon the word- development/coinage skills learned in LDL 350 and 450 to address even more complex lexical and contextual semantic domains. Prerequisites: LDL 350 Neologism Development I and LDL 450 Neologism Development II

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (NAS)

100 NATIVE AMERICAN KNOWLEDGE BOWL 1

This courses gives an in-depth look at the year’s knowledge bowl material as a means to help students prepare for the Knowledge Bowl competition.

101 OCHETHI SAKOWIN LANGUAGE FOR BEGINNERS 4

This course will provide an introduction to the Ochethi Sakowin language.  The course will emphasize the sounds of the Ochethi Sakowin language, correct pronunciation, and the alphabet used to represent those sounds.  The course will also focus on Ochethi Sakowin kinship terms, the numeric system, vocabulary for seasons, weather, animals, foods, environmental and cultural contexts, and basic sentence structure.

102 OCHETHI SAKOWIN LANGUAGE FOR ELEMENTARY LEARNERS 4

This is an advanced course designed to enhance the use of the Ochethi Sakowin language in both written and oral forms.  Emphasis is on pronunciation, a more advanced examination of grammar, an expanded vocabulary, and continued practice in reading, writing, and speaking the language.  Lessons will include discussion of Ochethi Sakowin history, culture, oral tradition, and ceremonies with specific reference to the language.  Prerequisite: NAS 101 Ochethi Sakowin Language for Beginners.

103 INTRODUCTION TO OCHETHI SAKOWIN LANGUAGE, CULTURE & HISTORY 4

This course will provide a brief overview of the language, history, and culture of the Ochethi  Sakowin peoples, including the present.  The Ochethi Sakowin Language will be included through the use of terms, basic phrases, names and other opportunities.  

105 OCHETHI SAKOWIN CULTURE I 3

This course will survey the history and culture of the Ochethi Sakowin groups, including both the past as well as the lived reality of the present.  Topics will include social customs, patterns of behavior, the social system (kinship), cultural beliefs and practices (rituals and ceremony), and oral literature.

*107 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY I 3

This course is an introduction to Native American history from before the European colonization through the 1760’s.

*108 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY II 3

This course is an introduction to Native American history from the era of the American Revolution through the 1920’s.

*109 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY III 3

This course is an introduction to Native American history from the era of the Indian Reorganization Act through to the present.

*110 OCHETHI SAKOWIN MUSIC AND DANCE 3

This course will provide an introduction to the music and dance of the Ochethi Sakowin.  The course will include the traditional repertory, cultural context of musical and dance performance, musical styles and song types, dance styles, and study of dance regalia.  

112 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES 3

This course will provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Native American Studies. This course meets the Education Standards and Practices Board Native American Studies requirement for teacher certification.

120 OCHETHI SAKOWIN TEACHINGS I 1

This course provides an in-depth study of the traditional teachings of the Ochethi Sakowin groups, with emphasis on Inipi and Hanblecheyapi.

121 OCHETHI SAKOWIN TEACHINGS II 1

This course provides an in-depth study of the traditional teachings of the Ochethi Sakowin groups, with emphasis on Wiawnyang Wachipi.

122 OCHETHI SAKOWIN TEACHINGS III 1

This course provides an in-depth study of the traditional teachings of the Ochethi Sakowin groups, with emphasis on Wanagi Yuhapi na Haunk Kagapi.

123 OCHETHI SAKOWIN TEACHINGS IV 1

This course provides an in-depth study of the traditional teachings of the Ocheti Sakowin groups, with emphasis on Isnathi Alowanpi and Thapa Wankayeyaypi.

*203 LOCAL TRIBAL GOVERNMENT 3

This course offers an introductory examination of tribal government, including analysis of the history, development, structure and politics of tribal peoples and governments.  The course will also include the issues of dual citizenship, the powers of tribal government, and the relationships between federal, state, and tribal governments.  Emphasis will be on Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

*204 NATIVE AMERICAN GOVERNMENTS:  TRADITIONAL AND CONTEMPORARY 3

This course will survey the structure of various American Indian tribal governments (both traditional and contemporary), and will examine the on-going struggle to retain sovereign powers of self-government over internal affairs and preservation of a land base and natural resources.  The course will examine key events and legislation in American Indian policy that have affected tribal governments and shaped how those political institutions relate to state and federal governments.  

*208 OCHETHI SAKOWIN TRADITION, PHILOSOPHY, & SPIRITUALITY 3

This course is an examination of traditional Ochethi Sakowin philosophical and spiritual beliefs, specializing in the study of documentation of the history and evolution of ceremonies and rituals, as well as the “thought-in-practice” of traditional medicine people.

210 OCHETHI SAKOWIN LANGUAGE FOR PRE-INTERMEDIATES 4

This is an advanced course in the Ochethi Sakowin Language designed to enhance the student’s oral skills.  Special emphasis is given to comprehension, conversational exercises, and mastery of verbal conjugations.  Prerequisite: NAS 102 Ochethi Sakowin Language for Elementary Learners.

211 OCHETHI SAKOWIN LANGUAGE FOR INTERMEDIATES 4

This is an advanced course in the Ochethi Sakowin Language designed to further enhance the student’s oral skills. Emphasis is on developing the student’s ability in oral expression so that a basic level of proficiency in everyday conversation will be acquired.  Prerequisite: NAS 210 Ochethi Sakowin Language for Pre-Intermediates.

213 OCHETHI SAKOWIN ORAL TRADITION AND STORYTELLING 3

This course will provide an introduction to traditional Ochethi Sakowin oral tradition and storytelling, including an examination of the general narrative structure, characters, content, and thematic characteristics of the categories of oral narratives as well as stylistic features and other aspects of the actual performance of storytelling.

218 NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE 3

A study of various works by Native American writers within an historical framework, both from the oral and the written literacy tradition.

*240 ETHNOBOTANY 4

The course will focus on identification of culturally important plants at various stages of growth. Topics include traditional uses; harvesting, preparation and storage protocols; and English, Ochethi Sakowin, and scientific nomenclature. The course will examine habitat diversity—including optimal growth conditions, plant origins (native and invasive), and the interdependence of all organisms. Laboratory required.

*245 NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN ART HISTORY 3

This is a survey course exploring the arts of North American peoples from Paleolithic to contemporary times.  Lectures, readings, audio-visual means, research and resource persons constitute the main learning activities.

*246 TRADITIONAL OCHETHI SAKOWIN ART 3

Lectures and demonstration of traditional arts forms.  Students will complete the production of one piece in a selected media.  

*247 NATIVE AMERICAN ART PROJECTS 3

Creation of art activity based on the five different cultural aesthetics:  Northwest Coast Transformation Masks, Plains Style Parfleches, Southeastern Shell Carving, Woodlands Beadwork, and Southwest Pottery Designs.  Students will be required to complete five (5) different projects.  

299 NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

301 OCHETHI SAKOWIN LANGUAGE FOR ADVANCED INTERMEDIATES 4

This is an advanced course in the Ochethi Sakowin language designed to enhance the student’s oral skills.  Special emphasis is given to comprehension, conversational exercises, and mastery of verbal conjugations.  Prerequisite: NAS 211 Ochethi Sakowin Language for Interemdiates

302   OCHETHI SAKOWIN LANGUAGE FOR PROFICIENT LEARNERS 4

This is an advanced course in the Ochethi Sakowin language designed to further enhance the student’s oral skills. Emphasis is on developing the student’s ability in oral expression so that a basic level of fluency in everyday conversation will be acquired.  Prerequisite: NAS 301 Ochethi Sakowin for Advanced Intermediates

309   COMPARATIVE SPIRITUALITY 3

This course will examine different religious traditions and dimensions of human existence in the world, both historical and contemporary.  The course will include such topics as the history of select religious traditions, outstanding individuals, key rituals and ceremonies, and perspectives on the sacred dimensions of human existence.  Emphasis will be on the Ochethi Sakowin religious tradition and spirituality.   

311   NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN 3

This course examines Native American women and their roles and experiences in traditional tribal societies.  The course will include both historical and contemporary periods, including the effects of Western values and gender/sex roles on Native American societies.

318 NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE 3

A study of various works by Native American writers within an historical framework, both from the oral and the written literacy tradition.

321   PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF NATIVE NORTH AMERICA 3

This course will provide a survey of the diversity of Native peoples and their cultures in North America, including coverage of tribes in all the major culture areas.  Topics covered will include origin stories, historical and cultural development, social and kinship systems, religious belief and ceremonialism.

331 NATIVE PEOPLES OF THE NORTHERN PLAINS   3

This course will provide an overview of the histories and cultures of the Native peoples of the Northern Plains region, including the Lakota/Dakota, Nueta, Hidatsa, Sahnish, and Anishinabe.

350 LANGUAGES OF NATIVE AMERICA 3

This course will provide an overview of Native American languages and linguistics, including topics such as genetic, areal, and typological classifications, structures of selected languages, comparative (historical) study of select language families, the relationship between language and culture, and select topics in the ethnography of speaking (sociolinguistics).

360 OCHETHI SAKOWIN CULTURE AND SOCIETY THROUGH ORAL & TEXTUAL SOURCES 3

This course will provide an in-depth study of select topics in Ochethi Sakowin culture and society through the use of textual and oral languages resources.

410   OCHETHI SAKOWIN HISTORY I 3

This course will provide a detailed study of the historical development and experiences of the Ochethi Sakowin peoples from before Euro-American colonization to the 1890’s.

411   OCHETHI SAKOWIN HISTORY II 3

This course will provide an in-depth study of the historical development and experiences of the Ochethi Sakowim groups from the 1890s to the present.

415 NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATION 3

This course will provide a general historical survey of the encounters between Native American and Western education systems, including traditional tribal education, mission schools, BIA schools, and current school systems both on and off reservations in the United States and Canada.

418 CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE 3

This is a discussion-based course that explores contemporary fiction, non-fiction, and poetry written by a range of Native American authors from tribes and geographical regions across the United States and Canada. We will look at the cultural context from which each text is produced, paying particular attention to the issues and themes emphasized in each text.

419 NATIVE SOVEREIGNTY AND DECOLONIZATION 3

This course provides an in-depth look at the multiple definitions and understandings of Native sovereignty, and how these definitions impact contemporary Native life.  In addition, this course gives an overview of the relationship between Native sovereignty and decolonization.  Prerequisite: NAS 203 Local Tribal Government, NAS 204 Native American Governments, NAS 109 Native American History III, or CJ 205 Indian Law

420   CURRENT ISSUES IN NATIVE NORTH AMERICA 3

This course will investigate a variety of contemporary issues in Indian Country, as well as the background for understanding present-day issues.  Topics might include sovereignty, blood quantum, tribal enrollment, loss and revitalization of native languages and other identity issues; tribal gaming; tribal education; law enforcement; and natural resources.

421 OCHETHI SAKOWIN SOCIAL AND KINSHIP SYSTEMS 3

This course will provide a detailed analysis of the social and kinship systems of the Ochethi Sakowin people, including the organization and structure of the thiyospaye and thiwahe units, appropriate use of kinship terms and their associated behaviors, the values and moral philosophies of the social system, and the expectations for proper roles of males and females within traditional Ochethi Sakowin society.

431   HISTORY OF TRADITIONAL OCHETHI SAKOWIN LEADERSHIP AND THE ITHÁŊČHAŊ 3

This course will provide a detailed analysis of the traditional Ochethi Sakowin system of leadership and government, including the organization and structure of traditional band and tribal government, how leaders were selected and expectations for their behavior and moral philosophies of the leadership system, and study of specific ithanchan (chiefs) who greatly influenced the historical direction of the Ochethi Sakowin groups.

440 STANDING ROCK CULTURE & HISTORY 1

This course will provide an overview of the historical development of the Standing Rock Reservation and a survey of the culture and society of the Hunkpapha, Sihasapa , and Wichiyena peoples who call it home.  The course will include an overview of the Ochethi Sakowin social and kinship system and discussion of the contemporary social and political structure of the reservation.  This course is one of a three-part series that can be used for teacher certification in fulfilling the Indian Studies requirement.

*445 APPLYING OCHETHI SAKOWIN CULTURE TO NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 3

Students will learn more about Native American perspectives on environmental issues and natural resource management.  Students will discuss the traditional and contemporary relationships between Native Americans and the environment.  Focus will be on Ochethi Sakowin culture.

450 INDIGENOUS RESEARCH METHODOLOGIES 4

This course discusses the role and impact of research in Native communities, including the need

for and development of tribal institutional review boards and the current call for indigenous

research practices.  Moreover, this course helps students develop their own indigenous

research methodologies.

497   NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES SENIOR CAPSTONE 1

This course provides students opportunities to gain supervised, practical experience working in a tribal community. A minimum of 45 hours of field experience and completion of a reflective presentation to the Native American Studies advisory committee are required. Students will be evaluated on quality of presentation and supervisor’s evaluation. Students must pass with a B or better.  

499 NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

DIVISION OF NURSING

NURSING (NURS)

101 INTRODUCTION TO THE NURSING PROFESSION 1

This course will explore nursing as a profession.  The student will be introduced to the concepts of health and wellness, holistic nursing practice, medical terminology, and the steps of the nursing process.  Ethical and legal issues will be discussed.  

201 HOLISTIC HEALTH ASSESSMENT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN 3

Holistic assessments across the lifespan and the skills necessary to do them will be the focus of this class.  Students will learn to do a systematic collection of health information using the nursing process.  Interviewing and documentation skills in particular will be stressed.  Laboratory required.  Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

205 BASIC PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSES 2

This course provides the student with an introduction to clinical drug therapy.  The basic knowledge and skills for the safe administration of drugs is taught.  The nursing process is applied to the administration of a variety of clinical drugs. Prerequisite: NURS 206 Fundamental Nursing Interventions

206 FUNDAMENTAL NURSING INTERVENTIONS 3

This course teaches the student the basic knowledge, principles, and skills fundamental to the practical nursing role.  The skills will include both traditional and complementary techniques.  The student will gain confidence in these skills by practicing on peers, self, and models.  Laboratory and nursing practice experience required.  Prerequisites:  BIOL 220 Anatomy and Physiology I; NURS 101 Introduction to the Nursing Profession, and NURS 201 Holistic Health Assessment

Across the Lifespan

206C FUNDAMENTAL NURSING INTERVENTIONS (Nursing Practice Experience) 1

Required nursing practice experience for NURS 206. This component would be offered in the fall (early September). Prerequisite:  NURS 206 Fundamental Nursing Interventions

231 MENTAL HEALTH/BEHAVIORAL HEALTH NURSING 2

This course focuses on assessing, promoting, maintaining, and restoring mental health across the life span.  Therapeutic communication techniques will be explored. Nursing practice experience required. Prerequisites:  NURS 206 Fundamental Nursing Interventions and concurrent enrollment in NURS 205 Pharmacology

245 NURSING CARE OF FAMILIES 4

Knowledge from previous courses is expanded and applied to the physical, psychosocial, emotional, and spiritual needs of the childbearing and childrearing family.  The focus remains on the role of the practical nurse in assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating nursing care under the supervision of a registered nurse when indicated.  Nursing practice experience required.  Prerequisites:  PSYC 255 Child and Adolescent Psychology, NURS 206 Fundamental Nursing Interventions and concurrent enrollment in NURS 231 Mental Health/Behavioral Health Nursing or consent of instructor.

246 NURSING CARE ACROSS THE LIFESPAN 9

This course focuses on the transitions and experiences of families and individuals during the adult years.  Knowledge from previous courses is expanded and applied to the physical, psychosocial, emotional, and spiritual needs of the maturing and aging family.  The focus remains on the role of the practical nurse in assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating nursing care under the supervision of a registered nurse when indicated.   Nursing practice experience required.  Prerequisites:  NURS 231 Mental Health/Behavioral Health Nursing and NURS 245 Nursing Care of Families

297 CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE IN NURSING 1

This course provides the student with the opportunity to develop confidence in their competence as they transition to the beginning practical nurse role.  This is a practical experience during which the student works closely with selected health professionals in a variety of nursing practice settings.  Prerequisite:  Satisfactory completion of all degree requirements for Associate of Science in Practical Nursing AND consent of Instructor.

299 NURSING SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANT)

299 ANTHROPOLOGY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER (CHW)

101 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY HEALTH 3

This course is designed to introduce Community Health Workers (CHWs) to the many elements influencing the health of communities.

201 CHRONIC DISEASE MANAGEMENT IN THE COMMUNITY 3

This course is designed to empower Community Health Workers to assist community members who live “day to day” with chronic illness in a community setting.  Special attention will be focused on the unique needs of American Indian communities related to chronic diseases that are common at the national level.

210 COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTH PROMOTION & DISEASE PREVENTION 4

This course addresses evidence-based components of promoting health and preventing diseases, with an emphasis on nutrition and physical activity.  Primary prevention and health literacy issues in community health will be emphasized throughout the course.  Course will include a lab/clinical component in collaboratively creating a detailed plan for a community-based HPDP project.  

220 CARING FOR ELDERS 3

This course will teach students the primary concerns, normal changes, diseases, and health care needs of elders who are living and aging in their communities.  Special attention will be focused on unique needs of elders living within Native American communities based on input from Native American elders.

230 TARGETED CASE MANAGEMENT 3

This course focusses on the step by step process of Targeted Case Management (TCM) as it is practiced in North Dakota.  There will be a strong focus on the North Dakota state-required documentation that is involved in delivering TCM services.

240 CHR BASIC CERTIFICATION TRAINING 5

This course prepares Community Health Representatives (CHR) to obtain the “CHR Basic Certification” from Indian Health Service.  The CHR Basic Certification training will adhere to the training requirements for CHRs as required by the National CHR Office/ Indian Health Service.  Laboratory required.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJ)

201 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3

Basic introduction to the three primary elements of the American Criminal Justice system – law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. The course will briefly explore the history of policing, constitutional law, criminal law, and the relationship between American law and Indian tribes and general aspects of tribal law.  

203 INTERVIEWING & INTERROGATION 3

This course is an Introduction to techniques commonly used to conduct one-on-one interviews and interrogations. Emphasis is placed on the legal and practical differences between interviews of witnesses and interrogations of criminal suspects. Course uses classroom settings and practical applications to identify and refine methods used to detect truthful, as well as deceptive, actions or responses.  Prerequisite:  CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

205 INDIAN LAW 3

This course will examine both tribal and federal Indian law from historical and social perspectives, the roles and functions of various agencies, and the processes involved in the administration of American Indian law.  Prerequisite: CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

208 FAMILY LAW 3

This course focuses on legal problems pertaining to the organization, operation, and dissolution of the family, including domestic relations, paternity, child custody, adoptions, and child and spousal support, with particular emphasis on Tribal codes and Native American issues including the Indian Child Welfare Act and the Violence Against Women Act.

209 WILL, PROBATE AND PROPERTY LAW 3

This course includes instruction on federal, state, and Tribal law relating to wills and trusts, the probate process, acquisition and allocation of property rights, forms and transfers of ownership, land use, government regulation of land, and fiduciary duties and responsibilities.

210 LEGAL RESEARCH, WRITING, AND CASE ANALYSIS 3

This course will familiarize students with the fundamentals of legal research, terminology, writing, and analysis, including law library techniques, computer-assisted legal research, citation forms, briefs, and court opinion discussions. Students will develop skills in researching and interpreting applicable federal and tribal statutes and case law, primary/secondary authority, and mandatory/persuasive authority.  Prerequisites: ENG 120 Composition II, CJ 215 Criminal Procedure, CJ 230 Criminal Law, CJ 225 Introduction to American Courts, and CJ 235 Criminal Evidence

215 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE 3

This course examines the methods and mechanics of the legal process with a particular emphasis on arrest, search, and seizure, and the rights and responsibilities of the various actors during the investigation and prosecution of a criminal act.  Prerequisite:  CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

221 CRIME, TRIBAL POLICY & TRIBAL POLICING 3

This course will explore the role, conflicts, and cooperation of tribal police agencies, Tribal courts, and Tribal governments in preventing crime and administering justice on the reservation. Special attention will be given to the many challenges faced by Tribal police departments, such as heightened crime rates, a lack of resources (working patrol vehicles, 911 systems, overall funding), and vast patrol areas. This course analyzes the structure of Tribal law enforcement and the ways it differs from mainstream policing; the role of women, tribal members, and others who comprise tribal law enforcement personnel; tribal jails and corrections; police training; and the legal, political, cultural, and historical issues that affect American Indian Tribal policing. Prerequisite:  CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

225 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN COURTS 3

This course examines the structure, jurisdictions, responsibilities, and constitutional authority of the various courts within the American criminal justice system.  Prerequisite: CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

226 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS 3

An introduction to principles and procedures used in criminal investigations including crime scene management and documentation, chain of custody, and evidence collection and preservation techniques. Prerequisites: CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

230 CRIMINAL LAW 3

This course investigates the principles of criminal accountability, including an analysis of substantive law and the elements necessary to prove crimes against persons, property, and society.  Prerequisite:  CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

231 CONTRACTS AND TORTS 3

This course presents a comprehensive analysis of contract law including terms and definitions; creation and termination; determining applicable law, contract formation, performance, and enforcement; breach and remedies; and Tribal codes, common law, and the Uniform Commercial Code. Students will also be introduced to basic theories of liability of torts and examine tort actions classified as intentional interference with persona, others’ property and negligence. Analysis of tort law will include intentional and business torts; strict liability and negligence; product liability and defamation; and affirmative defenses.  Prerequisite: CJ 210 Legal Research, Writing, and Case Analysis

235 CRIMINAL EVIDENCE 3

This course will provide an in-depth analysis of the rules of evidence within the American criminal justice system.  Topics include admissibility, relevancy, materiality, weight, burden of proof, examination of witnesses, testimony, and types of evidence.  Prerequisite: CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice.

245 SURVEY OF FORENSIC SCIENCES 3

This course is a basic investigatory analysis of the various disciplines involved in the Forensic Sciences and their application to the investigation and prosecution of criminal acts.  Prerequisite:  CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

252 CRIMINOLOGY 3

This course is a survey of the historical, philosophical, and theoretical causes and definitions of deviance and criminality and society’s responses to these issues with a special emphasis on the extent, theories of causation and punishment, and efforts at prevention of criminal behaviors.  Prerequisite:  CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

253 JUVENILE JUSTICE 3

This course examines the historical, philosophical, and organizational foundations of the American juvenile justice system and the functions, jurisdictions, and roles of the various juvenile justice actors and agencies.  Prerequisite:  CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

*260 ETHICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3

Examines the philosophical, moral, and ethical bases of human behavior from a criminal justice perspective. Students discuss justice, law, punishment, moral decision-making, and ethical and legal dilemmas in law enforcement, the courts, and sentencing.

265 TRIAL TECHNIQUES 3

This course is designed to familiarize students with the techniques and practices of the courtroom by utilizing mock student trials in which the students act as advocates, witnesses, judges, court officials, and police officers. Prerequisite CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice, CJ 215 Criminal Procedure, CJ 225 Introduction to American Courts, CJ 230 Criminal Law, CJ 235 Criminal Evidence

270 INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS 3

This course examines the various theories, models, and applications of corrections including retribution, rehabilitation, and isolation from historical and theoretical perspectives and examines the roles of various actors within the correctional system.  Prerequisite:  CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice

290 CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS 3

This course examines assorted approaches to criminal behavioral analysis.  Topics include the philosophical, taxonomic, and practical studies of the various types of criminal behaviors and their applications to the investigation and prosecution of crimes of violence.  

297 CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3

This provides the student with the opportunity to experience the employment areas of their program of study. Students will complete a minimum 135 hours of internship training provided by various employers in the Criminal Justice Field.  For those who are unable to, or choose not to find internship placement within their individual areas of interest, students who select the capstone experience option will pursue a plan of independent study relating to their chosen field of study culminating in a thesis and multi-media presentation.  Prerequisite: Students, through advisor approval, will only be allowed to complete the internship/capstone within the last two semesters of the Criminal Justice degree plan.  

299 CRIMINAL JUSTICE SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

*360 ETHICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3

Examines the philosophical, moral, and ethical bases of human behavior from a criminal justice perspective. Students discuss justice, law, punishment, moral decision-making, and ethical and legal dilemmas in law enforcement, the courts, and sentencing.

*365 TRIAL TECHNIQUES 3

This course is designed to familiarize students with the techniques and practices of the courtroom by utilizing mock student trials in which the students act as advocates, witnesses, judges, court officials, and police officers. Prerequisite CJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice, CJ 215 Criminal Procedure, CJ 225 Introduction to American Courts, CJ 230 Criminal Law, CJ 235 Criminal Evidence

499 CRIMINAL JUSTICE SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

ECONOMICS (ECON)

201 MICROECONOMICS 3

This course focuses on the nature, method, and scope of economic analysis, economic scarcity, resources, specialization of labor, supply-demand analysis, production and cost analysis, product and resource market structures, distribution of income, international trade, and economics of information and externalities. Prerequisite: MATH 102 Intermediate Algebra or higher

202   MACROECONOMICS 3

This course centers on aggregate income and employment analysis, business cycles, unemployment, inflation and economic growth, fiscal policy, money and monetary policy, the U.S. economy and the world economy. Prerequisite: MATH 102 Intermediate Algebra or higher

299 ECONOMICS SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

300 MONEY AND BANKING 3

An introduction to the financial system and the impact of money and monetary policy on the economy. Prerequisite: ECON 201 Microeconomics or ECON 202 Macroeconomics

310 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 3

An analysis of the factors affecting the economic growth and development of the nation and how it relates to the Standing Rock Reservation.  It will include discussion of problems that affect development of policies.

499 ECONOMICS SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

161 WORLD GEOGRAPHY 3

This is a survey course covering regions of the world with the emphasis on the economic, physical, and cultural criteria used to differentiate one region from another.

201 GEOGRAPHY I 3

An in depth course in regional geography covering the Western Hemisphere including Oceania (Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea and Pacific Islands).  Basic content and methodology of geography such as climate, landforms, populations, distribution, and analysis of human, physical, economic, cultural, and political features on a map will be covered.

202 GEOGRAPHY II 3

An in depth course in regional geography covering the Eastern Hemisphere including Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East (South West Asia).  Basic content and methodology of geography such as climate, landforms, population distribution, and analysis of human, physical, economic, cultural, and political features on a map will be covered.

299 GEOGRAPHY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

305 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY 3

This course examines the interconnectedness of geography and politics.

HUMAN SERVICES (HS)

101 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES 3

This course provides an orientation to the field of human services and provides an opportunity to explore human service occupations and professional organizations. Students will be familiarized with the roles and functions of Human Services workers through examination of the skills, knowledge, traits and attitudes necessary to enter the Human Services field. The ethical principles that guide the Human Services professional are explored in depth.  

102 INTERVIEWING I 3

This course is an introductory experience in active listening.  The emphasis is on basic awareness and communication skills, empathetic listening, and positive regard for the client. Students will explore methods of active listening, paraphrasing and summarizing, and respecting clients’ cultural backgrounds in all aspects of information gathering. The course provides students with the basic overview of the attitudes, knowledge, and skills which human service professionals need when they conduct interviews.

103 INTERVIEWING II 3

This course builds upon the basic skills learned in HS 102 Interviewing I.  It emphasizes the development of skills utilizing theories, practice and case application to allow students to conduct

interviews. The focus is on developing advanced skills and strategies with significant opportunity for hands-on practice. Prerequisite:  HS 102 Interviewing I

201 CASE MANAGEMENT I 3

This course introduces students to case management. Emphasis is given to the historical perspectives of case management, phases and models of case management and on concepts of effective intake interviewing, problem identification and assessment.  The course will concentrate in skill development as opposed to theoretical concepts.

202 CASE MANAGEMENT II 3

This course will build on HS 201 Case Management and will focus on service delivery planning, concepts of intervention and evaluation of interventions. Students will also gain skills for developing, implementing, and monitoring effective case plans and advocating for resources that help clients achieve self-sufficiency. Ethical and legal issues and surviving as a case manager will be explored. Prerequisite: HS 201 Case Management I

211 INTRODUCTION TO ADDICTIONS 3

This course will focus on an overview of historical, cultural and current attitudes toward drug use. This course provides students with the opportunity to study the various modalities of addiction. The interaction of physical, psychological, social and spiritual aspects of addiction will be explored as well as methods and models of treatment and various concepts of early intervention and prevention. This course will survey alcohol and drug abuse treatment methods needed for working with special populations, group techniques, relapse prevention, and non-traditional treatment methods.

220 MANAGEMENT & ADMINISTRATION IN HUMAN SERVICES 3

This course introduces students to the principles of human service administration. It is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of planning, evaluating, managing, community relations and other activities which affects the operation of a human service agency.  

*255 DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, ABUSE, AND NEGLECT 3

This course will cover violence in intimate relationships ranging from the traditional family situation to alternative family structures. Although considerable attention will be devoted to wife abuse and child abuse, substantial consideration will be addressed for elderly abuse, GLBT abuse, dating violence, neglect, husband abuse, and characteristic of societies and cultures which enhance and promote interpersonal violence. There will also be a section on how culture, race, and ethnicity impacts domestic violence and how interventions may need to be modified in order to meet the diverse needs women affected by violence in ethnic minority and immigrant groups.

260 CRISIS INTERVENTION/SUICIDE PREVENTION 3

This course focuses on introducing crisis intervention concepts and strategies applicable to the field of human services. This course covers crises throughout the life cycle and situations such as medical and psychological traumas, post-traumatic stress disorder and professional burnout.

297 HUMAN SERVICES INTERNSHIP 1-3

This course provides the student opportunities to gain supervised, practical experience working in a human service profession. A minimum of 135 hours of field experience and completion of a competency portfolio are required. Students must pass with a “C” or better.  One semester hour of credit is equivalent to forty-five (45) contact hours.  Prerequisites: Advisor approval and completion within the last two semesters of the Human Service Technician degree plan.

299   HUMAN SERVICES SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

310 GRIEF AND LOSS 3

Students will study the life cycle and other theoretical perspectives of loss and grief as well as the social justice, conceptual, cultural, and moral issues relating to death and dying. This course will enACCUPLACER an in-depth exploration of the physical, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of death and dying, and the process of bereavement. These topics will be considered with awareness of history and of various cultures with the central stress being on the present and on multiculturalism.

315 PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIPS 3

This course will provide the student with an in-depth look at the concepts, tasks and current status of parenting. It will focus on a variety of types of families, as well as the risks and challenges they face. Topics include parent education and participation in the learning process, family and community lifestyles, child abuse, and contemporary family issues.

320 YOUTH AT RISK 3

This course is intended to educate the student about the causes and special challenges of the at-risk adolescent. Alternatives to traditional outpatient psychotherapy or hospitalizations will be reviewed.

*455 DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, ABUSE, AND NEGLECT 3

This course will cover violence in intimate relationships ranging from the traditional family situation to alternative family structures. Although considerable attention will be devoted to wife abuse and child abuse, substantial consideration will be addressed for elderly abuse, GLBT abuse, dating violence, neglect, husband abuse, and characteristic of societies and cultures which enhance and promote interpersonal violence. There will also be a section on how culture, race, and ethnicity impacts domestic violence and how interventions may need to be modified in order to meet the diverse needs women affected by violence in ethnic minority and immigrant groups.

499   HUMAN SERVICES SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

POLITICAL SCIENCE (POLS)

115   AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 3

This course is a study of the United States federal government.  Topics covered are the U.S. Constitution, federalism, links between citizens and the government, institutions, civil liberties, civil rights, and public policy making.

116   STATE & LOCAL GOVERNMENT 3

This course will examine the structure and processes of state and community government, and their relationship to the federal government.  Special attention will be given to North and South Dakota government, and the interaction of state and local government with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Government.

*203 LOCAL TRIBAL GOVERNMENT 3

This course offers an introductory examination of tribal government, including analysis of the history, development, structure and politics of tribal peoples and governments.  The course will also include the issues of dual citizenship, the powers of tribal government, and the relationships between federal, state, and tribal governments.  Emphasis will be on Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

*204 NATIVE AMERICAN GOVERNMENTS: TRADITIONAL AND CONTEMPORARY 3

This course will survey the structure of various American Indian tribal governments (both traditional and contemporary), and will examine the on-going struggle to retain sovereign powers of self-government over internal affairs and preservation of a land base and natural resources.  The course will examine key events and legislation in American Indian policy that have affected tribal governments and shaped how those political institutions relate to state and federal governments.  

299 POLITICAL SCIENCE SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)

100 FIRST YEAR LEARNING EXPERIENCE 3

The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for students to learn and adopt methods to promote their success in school and life.   Topics in this course include critical thinking skills, career planning, time organization, test-taking, communication skills, study techniques, question-asking skills, library use, and personal issues that face many college students.

111 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 3

This course is designed to introduce students to the many and varied facets of psychology. Emphasis throughout the course will be on interactions of individuals in their cultural, social and economic environments as determined by their cognitive, behavioral and emotional experiences and training.

255 CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 3

This course examines the cognitive, physical and psychological changes that take place from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on the description and explanation of the dimensions of developmental change. Prerequisite: PSYC 111 Introduction to Psychology

258 ADULT AND END OF LIFE PSYCHOLOGY 1

This course examines the cognitive, physical and psychological (social and emotional) changes that take place from early adulthood through late adulthood. Emphasis is placed on the description and explanation of the dimensions of developmental change and tasks associated with the adult developmental period.

270 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3

This course will build the strengths of theoretical systems and clinical methods to provide students with a comprehensive and real-world overview of the field of abnormal psychology. This course will focus in on maladaptive behavior as a product of the interaction between personal vulnerabilities and resiliencies. Prerequisite: PSYC 111 Introduction to Psychology

299 PSYCHOLOGY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

355 ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING 3

This course provides an overview of the key ingredients necessary for a successful old age, with an emphasis on mental health needs of older persons. Also, common emotional problems facing older persons will be considered. The course will review a variety of treatment principles and skills supportive of positive mental health among the elderly. This course will examine commonly accepted stereotypes of later life and compare these myths with factual information about the physical, emotional, and spiritual changes that often accompany senescence. Healthy aging will be emphasized, as well as support systems available to older adults.

499 PSYCHOLOGY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3

SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

099 JOB SKILLS 2

This course is designed to assist students with developing the skills necessary to be successful in employment. The course will include self-assessment, exploration of career options, resumes, interviewing and job seeking skills.

120 TRANSITIONS-GRADUATION AND BEYOND 2

This course is designed to assist students with developing the skills necessary to be successful in the world of work. The course will include assessment, exploring careers, resumes, interviewing, and job seeking and job keeping skills. Prerequisites: Advisor approval and completion within the last two semesters of one’s degree plan.

110   INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 3

An introductory analysis of the nature of society, the interrelationship of its component groups and the process whereby society persists and changes.

210 CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY 3

This course provides an overview of the broad field of drug abuse and alcoholism including pharmacology, legal aspects of drug abuse, intervention and prevention, physiology and psychological aspects of alcohol. Alternatives to substance abuse and the self-destructing behaviors will be explored.

220 THE FAMILY 3

This course is designed to study the nature and functions of marriage and the family in contemporary society. The historical and cultural evolution of family structures and functions as well as distinctions and similarities are studied. The traditional and changing roles of women in American society are given special attention, along with the role of men and childrearing practices. Also discussed are problems of early marriage and intermarriage, mate selection, theories and research, divorce, and changing sexual norms, aging family members, dislocation and unemployment, teenage childbearing, chronic illness, families with special needs children, drug and alcohol abuse, domestic violence, crime and delinquency and family response to death.  Prerequisite: ENGL 120 Composition II

299   SOCIOLOGY SPECIAL TOPICS 1-3